2014-Goal 10

      2014 Strategic Plan

      2014 Strategic Plan

      2013-2014 Champions

      A Special tribute to WARHAWKS for an amazing season of play in 2013-2014 year: (1) winning a record six National Championships, (2) achieving unprecedented trifecta in the NCAA sports history, and, (3) achieving best finish ever, second place in the 2013-14 NCAA Director's cup (highest in UWW history).

      GOAL 10

      OVERVIEW

      Goal X: Increase campus capacity to connect students, faculty, and staff in service engagement, entrepreneurship, and economic development in ways that advance student learning and foster community and regional partnerships.

      Measure:  

      a.  Service Engagement:  assess number of students involved and quality involvement

      b.  Entrepreneurship and Economic development:  assess number of students, faculty, and community members involved;  assess financial value

      c. Identify community and regional needs

      Leaders: Denise Ehlen, ORSP; Seth Meisel, Continuing Ed.

      Team Members

      Frequency of the meetings:

      Executive Summary:

      Over the last two years, the group has defined and operationalized "service engagement, entrepreneurship, and economic development" and "community and regional partnerships" for the purposes of campus activities, as well as conducted a thorough literature review and asset mapping for the campus.  Much of this work has informed the campus' application to the Carnegie Community Engagement Certification (completed in April 2014), and has generated an invaluable list of key institutional strengths and weaknesses for further development.  Additionally, group members have developed institutional strategies to increase community engagement and outreach activities across campus, leveraging or reallocating existing programs/resources to increase the institution's visibility in the areas of engagement, entrepreneurship, and economic development. 

      Measures and Accomplishments

      The group operationalized "service engagement, entrepreneurship, and economic development" and "community and regional partnerships" for the purposes of campus activities and this goal

      An inventory of "service engagement, entrepreneurship, and economic development" activities were steered based upon the definitions/best practices derived from the literature and conducted a needs assessment of community/regional partners.  This information was also used to assess the value of "service engagement, entrepreneurship, and economic development."  Below is a summary list of the institution's strengths and weaknesses. 

      Measure a:  Service Engagement:  assess number of students involved and quality involvement  
      • There are institutional (campus-wide) learning outcomes for students' curricular engagement with community.  Community engagement is integrated into curricular (for-credit) activities.
      • On 15 April 2014, the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater submitted an application for the Carnegie Community Engagement Certification.  Drs. Susan Johnson, Barbara Beaver, and Seth Meisel spent months compiling information for the UW-Whitewater application, which included data provided by all of the campus' colleges and units regarding partnerships within the region.  A decision on the classification is anticipated by January 2015. 
      • The Undergraduate Research Program has worked, in collaboration with the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs and the Whitewater University Technology Park Innovation Center, to expand opportunities for undergraduate students by placing them into suitable applied projects affiliated with the Center. 
      • Created promotional materials (videos, for example) that demonstrate LEAP POEs to increase awareness and recruit a more diverse student population into the Launch Pad and iCorps.
      • Explored strategies to align all WhiP components with existing UW-Whitewater HIPs (i.e. Undergraduate Research experiences for iCorps, model Learning Community best practices in the iCorps, recruit iCorps participants from Learning Communities).
      • The LEARN Center sponsored a campus workshop on best practices in employing reflection papers to advance student learning in service learning courses led by Kim Jensen (Marquette University) in October 2013 with 24 faculty and staff in attendance.

      Measure b:  Entrepreneurship and Economic development:  assess number of students, faculty, and community members involved;  assess financial value  
      • There are examples of faculty and staff scholarship associated with outreach and partnerships activities (technical reports, curriculum, research reports, policy reports, publications, etc)
      • UW-Whitewater is developing a Service Learning Curriculum.  During the 2012-2013 academic year, seven faculty Community-Based Learning Fellows trained under coordinators Seth Meisel and Deilee Calvert-Minor. The goal was to "provide a year long professional development program for faculty interested in developing best practices in service learning courses and in assessing student learning."  A second cohort of Community Based Learning and Teaching Fellows have been recruited and trained to develop service learning courses focused on civic engagement for year long projects, which will run from Spring to Fall 2014.
      • iHUB Showcases have featured presentations by participants in the Whitewater Incubation Program (WhIP): iHUB Fellows, Mentors, and Scholars. WhIP consists of a number of different programs designed to provide coaching, mentoring, support, and service to new business ventures linked to the Whitewater University Technology Park Innovation Center.
      • Whitewater Incubation Program (WhIP):  Created a Whitewater Incubation Program mission that aligns with LEAP, entrepreneurship program/major learning outcomes, and the College of Business and Economic Outcomes Assurance of Learning (AOL) objectives.
       
      Measure c:  Identify Community and Regional needs

      The group conducted an inventory of "service engagement, entrepreneurship, and economic development" activities based upon definitions and conducted a needs assessment of community/regional partners.  This information was also used to assess the value of "service engagement, entrepreneurship, and economic development."  Below is a summary list of the institution's strengths and weaknesses. 

      Strengths

      • The institution indicates community engagement as a priority in its mission, vision and strategic priorities statement.
      • The executive leadership (Provost, Chancellor, Deans, etc.) explicitly promotes community engagement as a priority.  Community engagement is emphasized in strategic planning, marketing materials (website, brochures, etc.), recognition through formal campus-wide awards, infrastructure support, budgetary allocations, staffing plan, targeted outreach programs for community, systematic campus-wide tracking/documentation/assessment and professional development support for faculty and staff. 
      • There are institutional (campus-wide) learning outcomes for students' curricular engagement with community.  Service learning is integrated into curricular (for-credit) activities, diversity and inclusion work (for students, faculty, and staff).   Community engagement is connected to efforts aimed at student retention and success.

      Weaknesses

      • Limited external funding to support institutional engagement with community.
      • The institution does not maintain systematic campus-wide tracking or documentation mechanisms to record and/or track engagement with the community and its associated uses. 
      • There are no or limited institutional, college/school and/or department level policies for promotion (and tenure at tenure-granting campuses) that specifically reward faculty scholarly work that uses community-engaged approaches and methods. 

      Looking Forward: Future Themes/Goals/Action Plans

      • Increase efforts on assessing "engagement for student learning and identity".  There appears to be a disconnect between the value of an engaged university and how students' perceive the value of their service learning or community engagement degree requirements.
      • Identify and increase funding to support community engagement activities:  External funding is not generally dedicated to supporting institutional engagement with community.  The institution should identify strategies to increase the amount of external funding dedicated to support community engagement, along with aligning existing funds to support these efforts. 
      • Address deficiencies in systematic campus-wide tracking or documentation mechanisms to record and/or track engagement with the community and its associated uses.  UW-Whitewater should identify mechanisms and individual(s) responsible for tracking community engagement efforts and outcomes. 
      • Encourage faculty/staff personnel rules revisions to reflect recognition for scholarly work that uses community-engaged approaches and methods.

      2014 Strategic Plan

      2013-2014 Champions

      A Special tribute to WARHAWKS for an amazing season of play in 2013-2014 year: (1) winning a record six National Championships, (2) achieving unprecedented trifecta in the NCAA sports history, and, (3) achieving best finish ever, second place in the 2013-14 NCAA Director's cup (highest in UWW history).

      Location

      Office of Academic Affairs
      420 Hyer Hall
      800 West Main Street
      Whitewater, WI 53190
      Phone:  262-472-1672
      Fax:  262-472-1670

      54.197.74.130
      http://www.uww.edu/