2014-Goal 5

      2014 Strategic Plan

      2014 Strategic Plan

      2013-2014 Champions

      A Special tribute to WARHAWKS for an amazing season of play in 2013-2014 year: (1) winning a record six National Championships, (2) achieving unprecedented trifecta in the NCAA sports history, and, (3) achieving best finish ever, second place in the 2013-14 NCAA Director's cup (highest in UWW history).

      GOAL 5

      Overview

      Goal V: Collect, review and disseminate data regarding the levels of participation and effectiveness of high-impact educational practices for various student populations, and use these data to improve our high-impact practices.

      a. Measure:  Identify specific high impact practices to record: Identified
      b. Measure:  Record # of students involved in each HIP by student group: Data provided on some HIP programs
      c. Measure:  Define "effective" and establish criteria to identify and measure: Specific criteria were identified and measured
      d. Measure:  Record effectiveness of HIPs by student group: Measured
      e. Measure:  Create a report to disseminate: Yes
      f. Measure:  Each involved HIP identifies and notes changes based on data:  Partial data available and the work is ongoing
      g. Suggested HIPs to include:

      a.  Learning Communities
      b.  Undergraduate Research
      c.  New Student Seminar
      d.  Internships
      e.  Campus student employment

      Team Leader: Matt Aschenbrener, Assistant Vice Chancellor of Enrollment & Retention

      Team Members:  Bob Barry (University Center), Brent Bilodeau (Student Affairs), Catherine Chan (UG Research), Candace Chenoweth (Center for Global Education), Joan Cook (Assessment), Adrianna Guram/ Beth John (First Year Experience/Learning Communities), Rex Hanger/ Marjorie Rhine (Honors), Liz Hachten (Letters & Sciences), Richard McGregory (Multicultural Affairs and Support Services)

      Frequency of the meetings:  The committee met several times between March 2013 through April 2014.  Each of the HIP sub-committees met within their constituent groups to obtain information about student participation in the program, define the level of participation and level of effectiveness with the program and write a summary of the program.

      Exectutive Summary

      In the Fall 2012, the UW-Whitewater Strategic Planning and Budget Committee formed a committee to review "High Impact Practices" (HIPs). In addition to the HIPs articulated by George Kuh in High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter (2008), the committee split the Diversity/Global Learning category into the two subareas of diversity and global learning.  Further, the committee the areas of co-curricular activities, honors, and on-campus employment.  The committee categorized the HIPs into three groups:  Course-based, classroom-based and program-based.

      The Strategic Planning and Budget Committee (SPBC) (and Academic Affairs Staff, AAS) developed a list of "Potential Objectives" for the HIP committee. Those objectives are:

      1) Identify a list of High Impact Programs currently offered at UW-Whitewater.

      2) Identify the number of students participating in the High Impact Programs and compare to overall number in student body (identify multiple years to study?)

      3) Identify a list of various student sub-populations to study:

      4) Define "level of participation" and "level of effectiveness"

      5) Define metrics

      6) Make recommendations to SPBC/AAS on future improvements.

      First-Year Cohort and Retention Data for the student sub-populations studied.

      Number of Students in First-Year Cohort

      Year

      Under-represented minority

      Men

      Women

      First generation

      Pell Eligible

      Total in Cohort

      2012

      319

      1,062

         941

      953

      695

      2,155

      2011

      285

         994

         973

      923

      681

      1,993

      2010

      250

      1,060

         999

      929

      706

      2,033

      2009

      223

      1,000

      1,093

      898

      644

      1,941

      2008

      201

      1,107

      1,050

      NA

      634

      2,132

      2007

      197

      1,055

         993

      NA

      603

      2,048

      2006

      129

         944

         836

      NA

      423

      1,780

       

      Retention Rate of Students in First-Year Cohort

      Year

      Under-represented minority

      Men

      Women

      First generation

      Pell Eligible

      Total in Cohort

      2012

      63%

      74%

      80%

      73%

      74%

      77%

      2011

      76%

      78%

      82%

      78%

      82%

      80%

      2010

      68%

      75%

      79%

      76%

      75%

      77%

      2009

      67%

      76%

      81%

      78%

      81%

      79%

      2008

      73%

      77%

      79%

      NA

      87%

      78%

      2007

      63%

      75%

      77%

      NA

      80%

      76%

      2006

      76%

      77%

      77%

      NA

      81%

      77%

       

      Summary of Findings:

      At the start of the review the committee did not realize how complex of a task was at hand.  We found that many areas being reviewed actually contained multiple programs or could be looked at through multiple lenses; thus we had many conversations on what to review and how to review it.  Undergraduate Research, for example, has the traditional Undergraduate Research Program (URP) as well as the Research Apprenticeship Program (RAP); both programs needed to be reviewed.  The same was true for study abroad where short-term travel study programs could be viewed much differently than semester or year-long programs.  Other HIPs such as common intellectual experience and collaborative assignments were more nebulous and a challenge to quantify. Data on other programs such as internships, capstone courses, and service learning were also difficult to gather due to the nature of those specific programs.

      But we found that many of the High Impact Programs at UW-Whitewater are serving students quite effectively with high numbers of participation (e.g.. participation in co-curricular programs, New Student Seminar).  Some HIPs showed surprising retention rates - specifically on-campus employment.  Other programs, such as learning communities, had demonstrated success over the years.  Some programs demonstrated they are more effective for particular sub-groups. For example, female students tend to participate in more HIP programs at higher levels.  Other sub-groups such as URM students participate in study abroad and learning communities at the same or higher rates as the overall student population. Other HIPs had significantly lower URM participation, such as honors and on-campus employment.

      Measures and Accomplishments

      a. Measure:  Identify specific high impact practices to record

      The committee identified 14 areas of "High Impact Practices" on the UW-W campus (listed below in the table) as opposed to the Kuh model which lists 10 educational practices.  The additional four HIPs include:  The Diversity/Global Learning category was split into two areas - diversity and global learning.  The non-LEAP HIPs include: co-curricular activities, honors, and on-campus employment.

      High Impact Educational Practice

      UW-Whitewater Type

      Initial Group Leader/Current

      Page in Report

      Co-curricular activities

      Program

        Brent Bilodeau

      4

      Diversity (split from Global Learning)

      Program

        Richard McGregory

      6

      Global Learning

      Program

        Candace Chenoweth

      7

      Honors

      Program

        Rex Hanger/Marjorie Rhine

      12

      Learning Communities

      Program

        Adrianna Guram/Beth John

      16

      On-campus employment

      Program

        Bob Barry

      20

      Service Learning/Community-Based Learning

      Program

        Matt Aschenbrener

      26

      Undergraduate Research

      Program

        Catherine Chan

      28

      Capstone courses and projects

      Course

        Joan Cook

      35

      First-Year Seminars and experiences

      Course

        Adrianna Guram/Beth John

      37

      Internships

      Course

        Ron Buchholz

      40

      Collaborative assignments & projects

      Classroom

        Joan Cook

      46

      Common Intellectual Experiences

      Classroom

        Liz Hachten

      49

      Writing Intensive Courses

      Classroom

        Liz Hachten

      51

      b. Measure:  Record # of students involved in each HIP by student group:

      For the purposes of assessing, quantifying and reporting accurate data under each HIP practice, the HIPs were ultimately categorized into three groups: course-based, classroom-based and program-based.  As such, the sub-committees were organized to review specific metrics for student groups and assist with reporting final outcomes.   Representative data from Learning Communities, Global Education, On-Campus employment and Undergraduate Research are given below.   FULL RESULTS »

      c. Measure:  Define "effective" and establish criteria to identify and measure:

      1.  Define metrics - What to measure:  Learning outcomes of current programs, first year GPA, final GPA, retention, graduation, time to degree, NSSE questions, major, date of birth, class standing

      2.  Identify a list of various student sub-populations to study:

      Ethnicity, first generation, Pell eligible, international students, gender

      d. Measure:  Record effectiveness of HIPs by student group:

      Tables outlining specific metrics for student groups are presented in measure b.  The data shows an impressive correlation, in general, across all student groups, with HIP participants achieving higher educational outcomes.  Overall, students are more successful- They have higher 1st year GPA, retention and graduation rates when compared to non-HIP participants.  This observation is also true for underrepresented populations (e.g., URM, 1st Generation, Pell Eligible students).

      The table below shows trends in GPA averages over a six year period, 2006-2012, for select HIP groups.  With 95% confidence, it has been seen that each HIP has made a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) in the GPA based on data collected over the last several years (2006-12).

      Trends in First Year GPA Averages Over a Six-year period, 2006-2012, for HIP and Non-HIP participants at UW-W

      #'s

      HIP Practice

      Students GPA in HIP Programs

      Students GPA NOT in HIP programs

      Difference

       

      1

      On-campus Employment

      3.18

      2.88

      0.3

      2

      Learning Communities

      3.10

      2.96

      0.14

      3

      Honors

      3.71

      2.93

      0.78

      4

      Global Education

      3.30

      2.95

      0.35

      5

      URP

      3.41

      2.96

      0.45

        
      Engagement in HIP activities definitely plays a major role in the academic performance of Freshman students and directly contributes to their satisfaction and continuous enrollment beyond Freshman year. 

      HIP research tells us that it is not just one program or event that makes a difference; it is a combination of programs and services.  Additionally, the more HIPs students participate in, the higher level of retention, etc.

      e. Measure:  Create a report to disseminate:

      a link to the report is provided under section d, "supporting materials and links".

      f. Measure:  Each involved HIP identifies and notes changes based on data: 

      The current practices seem to be working well as evidenced by increase in Freshman GPA and retention rates over several years for each HIP category-the work is ongoing

      g. Suggested HIPs to include:  a. Learning Communities; b.  Undergraduate Research; c.  New Student Seminar; d.  Internships; e.  Campus student employment

      Highlights from HIP practices (learning communities, global education, campus student employment and undergraduate research) are presented in this report.  Review the full report, under "supporting material and links" for summary reports on other HIP activities.  

      Looking Forward: Future Themes/Goals Recommendations

      • A version of this committee should be continued during the next SPBC strategic planning process to further explore the High-Impact Educational Practices and their impact on student retention and graduation rates at UW-Whitewater.
      • SPBC should assist in the prioritization of expanding HIPs on campus. For example, the SPBC could assist in identifying sources of additional institutional funding and which programs should receive "priority" funding.
      • A centralized method is needed for collecting data on the students involved in HIPs.  One idea is that the data should be collected through "student groups" and maintained in WINS. 
      • An annual report on participation in HIPs using "student group" data and NSSE data should be conducted and reported to the campus community to show the activity in each area and for accountability. Both qualitative and quantitative methods of evaluation should be used to evaluate the programs and to learn more about each HIP.
      • The ability to gather information on specific sub-groups, i.e. first generation students, student-employees, needs to be assessed.
      • Additional conversations need to occur around HIPs that extend across all academic programs such as capstone courses, service learning, and internships. There are no common definitions and little coordination (i.e. course numbering) between the colleges in the offerings and thus these groups need to work closely to identify common issues, create policy across colleges, and develop the infrastructure to build the programs so they can be adequately staffed and evaluated. 
      • Some of the programs that utilize community partners, such as community-based learning/service learning and internships, need to not only build capacity with their external constituent groups, but also improve the relationships with host organizations in a manner that best represents UW-Whitewater.  These programs also need to work closely to identify common issues, create policy across colleges, and develop the infrastructure to build the programs so they can be adequately staffed and evaluated. 

      Supporting Material and Links

      Click here to view the report from goal group

      2014 Strategic Plan

      2013-2014 Champions

      A Special tribute to WARHAWKS for an amazing season of play in 2013-2014 year: (1) winning a record six National Championships, (2) achieving unprecedented trifecta in the NCAA sports history, and, (3) achieving best finish ever, second place in the 2013-14 NCAA Director's cup (highest in UWW history).

      Location

      Office of Academic Affairs
      420 Hyer Hall
      800 West Main Street
      Whitewater, WI 53190
      Phone:  262-472-1672
      Fax:  262-472-1670

      174.129.92.127
      http://www.uww.edu/