2014-Goal 7

      2014 Strategic Plan

      2014 Strategic Plan

      2013-2014 Champions

      A Special tribute to WARHAWKS for an amazing season of play in 2013-2014 year: (1) winning a record six National Championships, (2) achieving unprecedented trifecta in the NCAA sports history, and, (3) achieving best finish ever, second place in the 2013-14 NCAA Director's cup (highest in UWW history).

      GOAL 7

      OVERVIEW

      Goal VII.  Identify, examine and implement models for success for students of opportunity.

      a. Measure:  Identify existing programs  (1. Pathways to success, 2.  Tutoring, 3. New Student Seminar, NSS, 4. Learning Communities, LC, 5. Non-traditional student programs, 6. Summer Business Institute, SBI, 7. FTP )

      b.  Measure:  Examine success of existing programs ( 1. Retention,  2. GPAs, 3. Success in qualifying for entry into major, 4. Graduation)

      c.  Measure:  Identify "models for success" at other universities and compare to our own

      Team Leaders:  Richard McGregory and Matt Aschenbrener 

      Team members:   Frequency of the meetings:  multiple

      Executive Summary

      Diversity has the potential to increase the quality of learning. Diversity in the college classroom can foster intellectual development, reduce students' level of racial prejudice, increase tolerance towards racial and gender differences, and facilitate students' explorations of diverse perspectives (http://www.asha.org).  In 2000, racial/ethnic minorities comprised 30% of the U.S. population and were projected to represent approximately 50% of the total U.S. population by 2050 (U.S. Census Bureau 2000). Thus, UW-Whitewater must become a leader in recruiting and retaining students of opportunity to grow and succeed in the future.  

      Drs. Aschenbrener and McGregory have led the efforts to review models for success for students of opportunity as part of the 2012-2014 strategic planning process.  As Dr. Aschenbrener works with Enrollment and Retention functions and Dr. McGregory works with Multicultural Affairs and Student Success functions at UW-Whitewater, they identified, examined, and discussed many of the existing challenges and opportunities for current and prospective students at UW-Whitewater.  During multiple meetings, the team outlined process for executing the tasks to move the review forward.  Initial focus was to review National Best (or Sound) Practices for Underrepresented Multicultural (URM) student recruitment, retention and success.

      Best or Sound Practices:  The review led to first examining pre-admission and recruitment programs at Whitewater. The next step was an inventory of best practices aimed at orientation programs as well as academic and cultural support".  Further, the dimensions of existing UW-W programs including measures of success as set forth by the SPBC committee, such items as: retention rates, college GPA, entry into major, and graduation rates were examined. The last phase of the inquiry focused on recommendations for future programs or opportunities at UW-Whitewater.  After reviewing a number of state university system reports, articles, papers from national organizations dedicated to higher education advocacy efforts in the recruiting and retaining students of color, it was noted that themes emerged across the states and types of institutions. These articles indicated the need to provide students' support through a myriad of programs that span the following: pre-college and bridge programs, orientation programs, academic and cultural support programs.

      We came across a good example of best or sound practices from the Minnesota State Colleges and University system where an inventory lists programs and activities from across its 31 institutions, (http://www.asa.mnscu.edu/AccessandOpportunity/Index.html). This inventory lists programs and activities from across its 31 institutions.  The best practices for undergraduate retention indicated were: 1) Summer bridge program 2) Learning Communities 3) Intrusive Advising, and 4) Supplemental Instruction.

      The list below shows two sets of major activities;  Pre-college programs aimed at the recruitment of minority students and a myriad of Freshman-Senior general and targeted retention programs to assist in college success and life-skills (see the list under measure b).

      1.  Progression of Underrepresented Students through current UW-W Programs and Initiatives

      As outlined in the Best Practices section, pre-college programming is vital to the overall recruitment of minority students. Outreach and awareness campaign programs must be directed to where minority students are located. Thus, understanding the demographics of the school district and individual school levels are important.  Through admissions recruiting and the TRiO Upward Bound program, UW-Whitewater has been able to develop programs to reach URM students in the K-12 environment.

      The UW-Whitewater Admissions office has counselors assigned to the top feeder high schools in Wisconsin and Illinois.  Counselors visit those schools annually and read prospective student applications from those schools. Targeted admissions recruitment of URM students at UW-Whitewater occurs primarily through Rob Gambsky. Mr. Gambsky works with high schools in the Milwaukee Public School district. He conducts "Wheels to Whitewater" programs where UW-Whitewater pays for busses from the districts to UW-Whitewater.  Of the 361 first-year, URM students enrolled at UW-Whitewater during the Fall 2012 semester, 306 (84.7%) were from Wisconsin, and 131 (36.3%) had a Milwaukee address.

      Some examples of precollege/admissions/college transitional programming at UW-Whitewater include: Upward Bound Program/Summer Academic Camps/Great Lakes (Office of Precollege Programs); Summer Business Institute (MultiCultural Business Program); Future Teacher Program (College of Education); King/Chavez Scholarship/Summer Transition Program; Plan It Purple; U LEAD; Club U-Dub-Dub.   Periodically, funds have been obtained from external and internal entities to sponsor selected transition initiatives (e.g. Biology Bootcamp, QVVEP, STAR). 

      Wheels to Whitewater is designed to give multicultural students the opportunity to visit the UW-Whitewater campus while also exposing them to specific areas such as Admissions, Academic Advising, Athletics, Financial Aid and Multicultural Affairs and Student Success. This comes at no cost to the high schools as transportation and meals are covered by UW-Whitewater.  Historically, the program has served 325-400 students each year.  Moreover, Wheels participants that apply to UW-Whitewater have a higher than average yield rate.

      The Office of Pre-College Programs administers the Upward Bound Program, Pre-College Academic Camps, and Saturday College Program.  The Upward Bound Program, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, provides academic advising, tutoring, mentoring, and a six week summer academic enrichment experience to 68 college-bound students each year in grades 9-12 at targeted schools in Milwaukee and Racine. The Pre-College Summer Camps, which are largely funded by the State of Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, provides 200-300 low-income, first generation, and underrepresented multicultural students each year with academic, career, and cultural/recreational activities in a one, two, or three week residential experience to.

      Once URM students have transitioned to UW-Whitewater, they are served by a myriad of general and targeted retention initiatives.  These include programs offered by First Year Experience (New Student Seminar, Learning Communities) and support units such as MASS and AAEC (Pathway for Success) as well as targeted retention initiatives offered in academic colleges (COBE, COEPS) and support units.   Students that progress into their sophomore years and beyond are encouraged to participate in broadly defined high impact practices such as undergraduate research, travel study/study abroad, work and research internships, campus leadership and employment, service learning broadly defined; and, the University Honors Program. 

      Measures and Accomplishments

      Measure a:  Identify existing programs  (1. Pathways to success, 2. Tutoring, 3. NSS, 4. LC, 5. Non-traditional student programs, 6. SBI, 7. Future Teacher Program, FTP )

      Descriptions of Current Programs and Initiatives

      1.  Pathways to Success and Tutoring (1&2):  The Pathways for Success Program provides specialized academic advising and support services geared toward developing self-responsibility and motivation for learning as well as a defined academic and career plan.  The program was developed to better coordinate instruction, advising, and support services to assist students with remedial needs toward degree completion.  The first four cohorts of Pathways suggest an improvement in first to second year retention of approximately ten percentage points.

      The King/Chavez Scholars Program is designed to attract and retain exceptional incoming multicultural and first-generation undergraduate scholars for participation in high impact educational programs and initiatives such as: McNair Scholars Program; University Honors Program; Undergraduate Research Program; First Year Fall and Spring Semester Seminar; travel for conference presentations.  Students receive a scholarship during their freshman year.  The last five King/Chavez cohorts have had an average first to second year retention rate of 85%.  Moreover, participants from the 1997-2006 cohorts have had an average graduation rate that exceeds 60%.

      2. NEW Student Seminar, NSS and Learning Communities, LC (3&4):  The Office of First Year Experience hosts learning communities and the new student seminar.  First year students are invited to live and study with peers who share similar interests in learning communities (LCs) where approximately 25 students live together and share common courses. Learning Communities are led by faculty members who mentor students and encourage them to carry classroom discussions into their residential communities.  Moreover, more than 90% of each incoming freshman class enrolls in the one credit New Student Seminar that helps students connect with the campus, achieve academic success, succeed in a changing world.  Data consistently has shown higher first to second year retention rates for students that participate in learning communities and the New Student Seminar.

      3.  Multicultural Business Program (MBP) and Summer Business Institute (SBI) (6):  The Multicultural Business Program (MBP) is a specialized support program, and a cooperative effort between the College of Business & Economics, campus Academic Support Programs, and industry. The early identification of academically talented minority students for participation in summer internships and scholarship opportunities is a major benefit to students who participate in the program. In addition, students who actively participate in MBP interact and develop supportive relationships with other business majors; discuss current issues confronting professionals in the business arena, and gain insight into the expectations of business professionals.  The Summer Business Institute is a program offered by the Multicultural Business Program to help students of color successfully transition from high school to college at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. The SBI enrichment experience promotes excellence and provides its participants opportunities to gain a competitive edge as they pursue a business degree and go on to hold leadership positions in the business community.  SBI participants have had an average first to second year retention rate of over 87%.

      4.  Future Teacher Program (FTP) (7):  The Future Teacher Program (FTP) is an initiative for recruitment and retention designed to increase student learning and provide practical application of the knowledge received in their teacher education courses.  Students receive focused academic and professional support from freshman year through graduation.  Preliminary data suggests that FTP participants have an average first to second year retention rate of 80-90%.

      5.  Other Programs:  Biology Boot Camp is a program that welcomes 15-20 incoming freshman and returning sophomores to UW-Whitewater for a two-week summer session.  Students learn how to: work in a laboratory; take good notes; access campus resources; and improve their writing and oral communication skills.  Participants in the Biology Boot Camp have had a first to second year retention rate of over 86%.

      The McNair Scholars Program, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, prepares first-generation, low-income, and multicultural students for doctoral study and eventual careers as college professors.  The program: matches each student with a faculty mentor in their major; provides resources for undergraduate research projects; enhances students' quantitative, technology, test taking, research methods, and critical thinking skills; provides students with opportunities to present research findings at regional and national conferences; and provides stipends for on-campus and external summer research internships.  Over 80% of participants have gone to graduate school, approximately 55% of graduates have earned Master's degrees, and over 10% of graduates have earned terminal degrees.

      UG Research Undergraduate Research Program supports inquiry-driven research scholarship and creative activity. The program is an advocate for expanded experiential learning that enhances engagement in undergraduate research, scholarship and creative activity, including faculty-mentored research and curriculum-based projects. One of the program's goals is to create more opportunities for inclusive participation.

      Measure b:  Examine success of existing programs ( 1. Retention, 2. GPAs, 3. Success in   qualifying for entry into major, 4. Graduation)

      The UW-W has an impressive list of programs to choose from, as listed in measure a, for URM students' academic, leadership and career success.  Each program narrative provides qualitative and quantitative (retention and graduation) indicators related to program goals and success.  Overall, the data demonstrates high level of students' satisfaction and success in achieving their educational goals.  

      1. Pathways to Success and Tutoring:  The first four cohorts of Pathways suggest an improvement in first to second year retention of approximately ten percentage points.

      King/Chavez Scholars Program:  first to second year retention rate of 85%.  Moreover, participants from the 1997-2006 cohorts have had an average graduation rate that exceeds 60%.

      2.  NEW Student Seminar, NSS and Learning Communities: Data consistently has shown higher first to second year retention rates.

      3.  Summer Business Institute (SBI):  SBI participants have had an average first to second year retention rate of over 87%.

      Multicultural Business Program:  Students who actively participate in MBP interact and develop supportive relationships with other business majors; discuss current issues confronting professionals in the business arena, and gain insight into the expectations of business professionals

      4. Future Teacher Program (FTP):  Preliminary data suggests that FTP participants have an average first to second year retention rate of 80-90%

      5.  Biology Boot Camp:  Participants in the Biology Boot Camp have had a first to second year retention rate of over 86%

      6. McNair Scholars Program:  Over 80% of participants have gone to graduate school, approximately 55% of graduates have earned Master's degrees, and over 10% of graduates have earned terminal degrees

      Measure c:  Identify "models for success" at other universities and compare to our own
      • Models for success at other campuses (a literature review):  Provide students' support through programs that span the following: pre-college and bridge programs, orientation programs, academic and cultural support programs.
      • From Minnesota State Colleges and University System (MnSCU): Summer Bridge program; Learning Communities, Intrusive Advising, and the use of Supplemental Instruction.


      Based on successful models identified at other campuses and a quick review of programs at UW-Whitewater, the institution's commitment is readily apparent considering an impressive list of programs, certainly at or above the national norms, targeted to enhance students' of opportunity success.         

      Looking Forward: Future themes/goals/recommendations

      The reality in the United States is that a major proportion of racial/ethnic minority students have unequal access to higher education (Ntiri, 2001). Many experience a variety of personal, environmental, and institutional barriers that result in limited or no access to college and university education (Opp, 2001; Thomason & Thurber, 1999). Some of these barriers include financial difficulty and lack of financial aid, the need to work full-time, lack of family support, lack of information about the college preparation and application process, low scores on traditional college admission tests, and often, an absence of role models who have gone to college (Lee, 1991; Ntiri, 2001).  As we develop future programs at UW-Whitewater, we need to not only take into account the existing programs that have been successful for us, but also take into account the barriers that inhibit or prevent students from attending the university.

      The following is a listing of programs and initiatives that could be developed/implemented/expanded to enhance the success of racial/ethnic minority students at UW-Whitewater:

      • Expand URM Special Program Recruitment (Wheels)
      • Expand the number of King/Chavez Scholarships from 50-60/year to 75-100/year
      • Expand Summer Transition programming to impact more students: 
          • This would also require greater coordination and collaboration between existing programs (i.e. Biology Bootcamp, King/Chavez, Center for Students with Disabilities, Summer Business Institute, Future Teacher Program)
          • This could also involve the development of an extensive "bridge" program for students needing developmental coursework and/or admitted conditionally such as the Summer Collegiate Experience (SCE) offered by UW-Madison
      • Expand STEM initiatives to include "Science camps" targeted toward URM students in grades 6-11
          • This could complement campus efforts such as Biology Bootcamp, Research Apprenticeship Program (RAP), and McNair Scholars Program
          • This could also evolve into a 4-year program for URM students in STEM areas similar to FTP and MBP
      • Commit to institutionalize and institutionally customize TRIO type efforts to support students
          • This would be similar to the campus commitment to institutionalize Pathways for Success at 100 students per entering cohort in light of the fact that the Pathways model is similar to the federal Student Support Services (SSS) model
          • Expansion of the King/Chavez Coordinator from 50% to 100% position:  could be expanded to customize and institutionalize efforts to engage URM students in undergraduate research, which will be particularly important if there are future funding challenges for the federal McNair Scholars Program
      • Provide additional staffing to support URM students
          • Full-time staff members could better support African American, Latino, Southeast Asian, and Native American students through intrusive advising where Multicultural Retention Initiatives in MASS currently utilize graduate/undergraduate peer advisors

      2014 Strategic Plan

      2013-2014 Champions

      A Special tribute to WARHAWKS for an amazing season of play in 2013-2014 year: (1) winning a record six National Championships, (2) achieving unprecedented trifecta in the NCAA sports history, and, (3) achieving best finish ever, second place in the 2013-14 NCAA Director's cup (highest in UWW history).

      Location

      Office of Academic Affairs
      420 Hyer Hall
      800 West Main Street
      Whitewater, WI 53190
      Phone:  262-472-1672
      Fax:  262-472-1670

      54.196.108.89
      http://www.uww.edu/