Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence

Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence

 SEXUAL ASSAULT, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, AND STALKING

Preventing and Responding to Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking

The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater (UWW) prohibits the crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, or other forms of sexual misconduct. Offenders may be subject to appropriate campus adjudication processes, disciplinary action, and/or criminal proceedings. UWW utilizes procedures that provide prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and resolution in cases involving domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. These procedures are carried out by officials who receive annual training on these issues as well as how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability.

Sexual violence is a form of sexual harassment and services are available to students, faculty, and staff who experience sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, and instances of stalking. In these situations, UWW is committed to providing crisis intervention measures for students, faculty, and staff, as well as appropriate administrative response for the complainant and respondent; referring individuals to criminal authorities; and educating and promoting discussion on interpersonal abuse and violence issues. The University’s process does not preclude adjudication under state law.

UWW prohibits retaliation by its officers, employees, students, or agents against a person who exercises their rights or responsibilities under any provision federal or state law, including Title IX and the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (VAWA), or this policy.

Definitions

The Wisconsin State Legislature utilizes the following definitions:

940.225 Sexual assault

(1)  First degree sexual assault. Whoever does any of the following is guilty of a Class B felony:

(a) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with another person without consent of that person and causes pregnancy or great bodily harm to that person.

(b) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with another person without consent of that person by use or threat of use of a dangerous weapon or any article used or fashioned in a manner to lead the victim reasonably to believe it to be a dangerous weapon.

(c) Is aided or abetted by one or more other persons and has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with another person without consent of that person by use or threat of force or violence.

 (2) Second degree sexual assault. Whoever does any of the following is guilty of a Class C felony:

(a) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with another person without consent of that person by use or threat of force or violence.

(b) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with another person without consent of that person and causes injury, illness, disease or impairment of a sexual or reproductive organ, or mental anguish requiring psychiatric care for the victim.

(c) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with a person who suffers from a mental illness or deficiency which renders that person temporarily or permanently incapable of appraising the person's conduct, and the defendant knows of such condition.

(cm) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with a person who is under the influence of an intoxicant to a degree which renders that person incapable of giving consent if the defendant has actual knowledge that the person is incapable of giving consent and the defendant has the purpose to have sexual contact or sexual intercourse with the person while the person is incapable of giving consent.

(d) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with a person who the defendant knows is unconscious.

(f) Is aided or abetted by one or more other persons and has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with another person without the consent of that person.

(g) Is an employee of a facility or program under s. 940.295 (2) (b), (c), (h) or (k) and has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with a person who is a patient or resident of the facility or program.

(h) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with an individual who is confined in a correctional institution if the actor is a correctional staff member. This paragraph does not apply if the individual with whom the actor has sexual contact or sexual intercourse is subject to prosecution for the sexual contact or sexual intercourse under this section.

(i) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with an individual who is on probation, parole, or extended supervision if the actor is a probation, parole, or extended supervision agent who supervises the individual, either directly or through a subordinate, in his or her capacity as a probation, parole, or extended supervision agent or who has influenced or has attempted to influence another probation, parole, or extended supervision agent's supervision of the individual. This paragraph does not apply if the individual with whom the actor has sexual contact or sexual intercourse is subject to prosecution for the sexual contact or sexual intercourse under this section.

(j) Is a licensee, employee, or nonclient resident of an entity, as defined in s. 48.685 (1) (b) or 50.065 (1) (c), and has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with a client of the entity.

 (3) Third degree sexual assault. Whoever has sexual intercourse with a person without the consent of that person is guilty of a Class G felony. Whoever has sexual contact in the manner described in sub. (5) (b) 2. or 3. with a person without the consent of that person is guilty of a Class G felony.

 (3m) Fourth degree sexual assault. Except as provided in sub. (3), whoever has sexual contact with a person without the consent of that person is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.

 (4) Consent. "Consent", as used in this section, means words or overt actions by a person who is competent to give informed consent indicating a freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact. Consent is not an issue in alleged violations of sub. (2) (c), (cm), (d), (g), (h), and (i). The following persons are presumed incapable of consent but the presumption may be rebutted by competent evidence, subject to the provisions of s. 972.11 (2):

(b) A person suffering from a mental illness or defect which impairs capacity to appraise personal conduct.

(c) A person who is unconscious or for any other reason is physically unable to communicate unwillingness to an act.

 (5) Definitions. In this section:

(abm) "Client" means an individual who receives direct care or treatment services from an entity.

(acm) "Correctional institution" means a jail or correctional facility, as defined in s. 961.01 (12m), a juvenile correctional facility, as defined in s. 938.02 (10p), or a juvenile detention facility, as defined in s. 938.02 (10r).

(ad) "Correctional staff member" means an individual who works at a correctional institution, including a volunteer.

(ag) "Inpatient facility" has the meaning designated in s. 51.01 (10).

(ai) "Intoxicant" means any alcohol beverage, hazardous inhalant, controlled substance, controlled substance analog, or other drug, or any combination thereof.

(ak) "Nonclient resident" means an individual who resides, or is expected to reside, at an entity, who is not a client of the entity, and who has, or is expected to have, regular, direct contact with the clients of the entity.

(am) "Patient" means any person who does any of the following:

1. Receives care or treatment from a facility or program under s. 940.295 (2) (b), (c), (h) or (k), from an employee of a facility or program or from a person providing services under contract with a facility or program.

2. Arrives at a facility or program under s. 940.295 (2) (b), (c), (h) or (k) for the purpose of receiving care or treatment from a facility or program under s. 940.295 (2) (b), (c), (h) or (k), from an employee of a facility or program under s. 940.295 (2) (b), (c), (h) or (k), or from a person providing services under contract with a facility or program under s. 940.295 (2) (b), (c), (h) or (k).

(ar) "Resident" means any person who resides in a facility under s. 940.295 (2) (b), (c), (h) or (k).

(b) "Sexual contact" means any of the following:

1. Any of the following types of intentional touching, whether direct or through clothing, if that intentional touching is either for the purpose of sexually degrading; or for the purpose of sexually humiliating the complainant or sexually arousing or gratifying the defendant or if the touching contains the elements of actual or attempted battery under s. 940.19 (1):

a. Intentional touching by the defendant or, upon the defendant's instruction, by another person, by the use of any body part or object, of the complainant's intimate parts.

b. Intentional touching by the complainant, by the use of any body part or object, of the defendant's intimate parts or, if done upon the defendant's instructions, the intimate parts of another person.

2. Intentional penile ejaculation of ejaculate or intentional emission of urine or feces by the defendant or, upon the defendant's instruction, by another person upon any part of the body clothed or unclothed of the complainant if that ejaculation or emission is either for the purpose of sexually degrading or sexually humiliating the complainant or for the purpose of sexually arousing or gratifying the defendant.

3. For the purpose of sexually degrading or humiliating the complainant or sexually arousing or gratifying the defendant, intentionally causing the complainant to ejaculate or emit urine or feces on any part of the defendant's body, whether clothed or unclothed.

(c) "Sexual intercourse" includes the meaning assigned under s. 939.22 (36) as well as cunnilingus, fellatio or anal intercourse between persons or any other intrusion, however slight, of any part of a person's body or of any object into the genital or anal opening either by the defendant or upon the defendant's instruction. The emission of semen is not required.

(d) "State treatment facility" has the meaning designated in s. 51.01 (15).

 

968.075 Domestic abuse incidents; arrest and prosecution

(1)  Definitions. In this section:

(a) "Domestic abuse" means any of the following engaged in by an adult person against his or her spouse or former spouse, against an adult with whom the person resides or formerly resided or against an adult with whom the person has a child in common:

1. Intentional infliction of physical pain, physical injury or illness.

2. Intentional impairment of physical condition.

3. A violation of s. 940.225 (1), (2) or (3).

4. A physical act that may cause the other person reasonably to fear imminent engagement in the conduct described under subd. 1., 2. or 3.

(b) "Law enforcement agency" has the meaning specified in s. 165.83 (1) (b).

(d) "Party" means a person involved in a domestic abuse incident.

(e) "Predominant aggressor" means the most significant, but not necessarily the first, aggressor in a domestic abuse incident.

 (2) Circumstances requiring arrest; presumption against certain arrests.

(a) Notwithstanding s. 968.07 (1) and except as provided in pars. (am) and (b), a law enforcement officer shall arrest and take a person into custody if:

1. The officer has reasonable grounds to believe that the person is committing or has committed domestic abuse and that the person's actions constitute the commission of a crime; and

2. Any of the following apply:

a. The officer has a reasonable basis for believing that continued domestic abuse against the alleged victim is likely.

b. There is evidence of physical injury to the alleged victim.

c. The person is the predominant aggressor.

(am) Notwithstanding s. 968.07 (1), unless the person's arrest is required under s. 813.12 (7), 813.122 (10), 813.125 (6), or 813.128 (1) (b) or sub. (5) (e), if a law enforcement officer identifies the predominant aggressor, it is generally not appropriate for a law enforcement officer to arrest anyone under par. (a) other than the predominant aggressor.

(ar) In order to protect victims from continuing domestic abuse, a law enforcement officer shall consider all of the following in identifying the predominant aggressor:

1. The history of domestic abuse between the parties, if it can be reasonably ascertained by the officer, and any information provided by witnesses regarding that history.

2. Statements made by witnesses.

3. The relative degree of injury inflicted on the parties.

4. The extent to which each person present appears to fear any party.

5. Whether any party is threatening or has threatened future harm against another party or another family or household member.

6. Whether either party acted in self-defense or in defense of any other person under the circumstances described in s. 939.48.

(b) If the officer's reasonable grounds for belief under par. (a) 1. are based on a report of an alleged domestic abuse incident, the officer is required to make an arrest under par. (a) only if the report is received, within 28 days after the day the incident is alleged to have occurred, by the officer or the law enforcement agency that employs the officer.

 

940.32 Stalking.

(1) In this section:

(a) "Course of conduct" means a series of 2 or more acts carried out over time, however short or long, that show a continuity of purpose, including any of the following:

1. Maintaining a visual or physical proximity to the victim.

2. Approaching or confronting the victim.

3. Appearing at the victim's workplace or contacting the victim's employer or coworkers.

4. Appearing at the victim's home or contacting the victim's neighbors.

5. Entering property owned, leased, or occupied by the victim.

6. Contacting the victim by telephone or causing the victim's telephone or any other person's telephone to ring repeatedly or continuously, regardless of whether a conversation ensues.

6m. Photographing, videotaping, audiotaping, or, through any other electronic means, monitoring or recording the activities of the victim. This subdivision applies regardless of where the act occurs.

7. Sending material by any means to the victim or, for the purpose of obtaining information about, disseminating information about, or communicating with the victim, to a member of the victim's family or household or an employer, coworker, or friend of the victim.

8. Placing an object on or delivering an object to property owned, leased, or occupied by the victim.

9. Delivering an object to a member of the victim's family or household or an employer, coworker, or friend of the victim or placing an object on, or delivering an object to, property owned, leased, or occupied by such a person with the intent that the object be delivered to the victim.

10. Causing a person to engage in any of the acts described in subds. 1. to 9.

(am) "Domestic abuse" has the meaning given in s. 813.12 (1) (am).

(ap) "Domestic abuse offense" means an act of domestic abuse that constitutes a crime.

(c) "Labor dispute" includes any controversy concerning terms, tenure or conditions of employment, or concerning the association or representation of persons in negotiating, fixing, maintaining, changing or seeking to arrange terms or conditions of employment, regardless of whether the disputants stand in the proximate relation of employer and employee.

(cb) "Member of a family" means a spouse, parent, child, sibling, or any other person who is related by blood or adoption to another.

(cd) "Member of a household" means a person who regularly resides in the household of another or who within the previous 6 months regularly resided in the household of another.

(cg) "Personally identifiable information" has the meaning given in s. 19.62 (5).

(cr) "Record" has the meaning given in s. 19.32 (2).

(d) "Suffer serious emotional distress" means to feel terrified, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or tormented.

 (2) Whoever meets all of the following criteria is guilty of a Class I felony:

(a) The actor intentionally engages in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person under the same circumstances to suffer serious emotional distress or to fear bodily injury to or the death of himself or herself or a member of his or her family or household.

(b) The actor knows or should know that at least one of the acts that constitute the course of conduct will cause the specific person to suffer serious emotional distress or place the specific person in reasonable fear of bodily injury to or the death of himself or herself or a member of his or her family or household.

(c) The actor's acts cause the specific person to suffer serious emotional distress or induce fear in the specific person of bodily injury to or the death of himself or herself or a member of his or her family or household.

 (2e) Whoever meets all of the following criteria is guilty of a Class I felony:

(a) After having been convicted of sexual assault under s. 940.225, 948.02, 948.025, or 948.085 or a domestic abuse offense, the actor engages in any of the acts listed in sub. (1) (a) 1. to 10., if the act is directed at the victim of the sexual assault or the domestic abuse offense.

(b) The actor knows or should know that the act will cause the specific person to suffer serious emotional distress or place the specific person in reasonable fear of bodily injury to or the death of himself or herself or a member of his or her family or household.

(c) The actor's act causes the specific person to suffer serious emotional distress or induces fear in the specific person of bodily injury to or the death of himself or herself or a member of his or her family or household.

 (2m) Whoever violates sub. (2) is guilty of a Class H felony if any of the following applies:

(a) The actor has a previous conviction for a violent crime, as defined in s. 939.632 (1) (e) 1., or a previous conviction under this section or s. 947.013 (1r), (1t), (1v), or (1x).

(b) The actor has a previous conviction for a crime, the victim of that crime is the victim of the present violation of sub. (2), and the present violation occurs within 7 years after the prior conviction.

(c) The actor intentionally gains access or causes another person to gain access to a record in electronic format that contains personally identifiable information regarding the victim in order to facilitate the violation.

(d) The person violates s. 968.31 (1) or 968.34 (1) in order to facilitate the violation.

(e) The victim is under the age of 18 years at the time of the violation.

 (3) Whoever violates sub. (2) is guilty of a Class F felony if any of the following applies:

(a) The act results in bodily harm to the victim or a member of the victim's family or household.

(b) The actor has a previous conviction for a violent crime, as defined in s. 939.632 (1) (e) 1., or a previous conviction under this section or s. 947.013 (1r), (1t), (1v) or (1x), the victim of that crime is the victim of the present violation of sub. (2), and the present violation occurs within 7 years after the prior conviction.

(c) The actor uses a dangerous weapon in carrying out any of the acts listed in sub. (1) (a) 1. to 9.

 (3m) A prosecutor need not show that a victim received or will receive treatment from a mental health professional in order to prove that the victim suffered serious emotional distress under sub. (2) (c) or (2e) (c).

 (4) 

(a) This section does not apply to conduct that is or acts that are protected by the person's right to freedom of speech or to peaceably assemble with others under the state and U.S. constitutions, including, but not limited to, any of the following:

1. Giving publicity to and obtaining or communicating information regarding any subject, whether by advertising, speaking or patrolling any public street or any place where any person or persons may lawfully be.

2. Assembling peaceably.

3. Peaceful picketing or patrolling.

(b) Paragraph (a) does not limit the activities that may be considered to serve a legitimate purpose under this section.

 (5) This section does not apply to conduct arising out of or in connection with a labor dispute.

 (6) The provisions of this statute are severable. If any provision of this statute is invalid or if any application thereof is invalid, such invalidity shall not affect other provisions or applications which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application.

 

Bystander Intervention

Many people think that sexual assault only affects the victim, when in fact entire families, friend groups, and communities are hurt. Campuses suffer from the victims who drop out, the perpetrators who cause fear, and the classrooms that are distracted. It’s simple. If you see something, say something.

-          Before it even happens, listen up for rape jokes and sexist language. You don’t have to laugh or participate.

-          If you witness something happening, step in. Create a diversion. Even if you don’t know the person who looks in trouble, you can still help. Get them to a safe place. Remember, it’s your campus, so it’s your business.

-          You can be a bystander even after an assault. Learn what options rape victims have available to them on this campus and be supportive of their choices.

Risk Reduction

Preventing Perpetration and Protecting Yourself: Strategies to Prevent Perpetration

-          Understand and respect your partner’s limits.

-          Men who use sexually callous language are more likely to perpetrate sexual assault. The next time you hear yourself or someone else talking about women or sex in a derogatory way, stop. Speak up when you hear others talk this way— men or women!

-          Know your own sexual limits.

-          Learn more about how men and women communicate differently.

-          Listen to or read the story of a survivor.

-          Make sure you have consent. Consent is a clear and freely given yes, not the absence of a no. People who are incapacitated by alcohol or drugs cannot give consent.

 

Strategies to Protect Yourself:

-          Practice being assertive about your boundaries.

-          If saying NO or STOP is too hard, consider creating a diversion so you can leave.

-          Enroll in Chimera or another self-defense program that focuses on sexual assault.

-          Set your drinking limits before you start drinking.

-          Get your own drinks; don’t let someone continually fill your cup or leave your drink unattended.

 

Signs of an abusive dating partner may include:

-          Calls you names, insults you, or continually criticizes you

-          Does not trust you and acts possessive or jealous

-          Tries to isolate you from family or friends

-          Monitors where you go, who you call, and who you spent time with

-          Controls finances or refuses to share money

-          Punishes you by withholding affection

-          Expects you to ask permission

-          Threatens to hurt you, your family, your pets, or belongings

-          Threatens and/or uses a weapon against you

-          Has ever forced, coerced, or manipulated you into having sex or performing sexual acts

-          Accuses you of cheating or is often jealous of your relationships with others of the opposite gender

-          Trapped you in your apartment or dorm room and kept you from leaving

-          IM, text messages, and calls you obsessively to find out where you are and what you are doing

 

Remember, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking are never the fault of the victim; they are the choice of the perpetrator.

Services and Reporting Options for Victims/Survivors: Common Questions

Students who experience sexual assault, dating violence, and/or stalking have many options and services available to them on and off campus, including counseling; victim advocacy; access to the criminal and campus disciplinary systems; medical attention. All of these services are available to students regardless of their choice to report the incident to law enforcement, and most are free.

Sexual Assaults should be immediately reported to the UWW Police at 262-472-4660. In addition, individuals may also report a sex offense to UW-Whitewater’s Title IX Coordinator (Dr. Elizabeth Ogunsola, Hyer Hall, Room 330, 262-472-5669, ogunsole@uww.edu) or the Dean of Students office.

A victim has the option to notify or not notify the appropriate law enforcement agency to report a sexual assault. If the crime occurred on UWW property, UWWPD has jurisdiction on the campus. If the crime occurred off campus, the victim can notify the appropriate local law enforcement agency with jurisdiction at the location of the crime. UWWPD will assist the victim in identifying the correct law enforcement agency and will assist the victim in reporting it to that agency.

We know that many student victims do not feel comfortable talking to law enforcement, campus administrators, professors, or advisors. The campus provides training and information to these staff, but if you find yourself unable to seek help from one of the offices listed below, we encourage you to tell a trusted friend or family member. Healing can look different for everyone.

It is important to preserve evidence and Persons who have been victims of sexual assault should refrain from bathing or douching and should not wash clothing or bed linens.  Such evidence may be helpful in criminal prosecution or in obtaining a protection order.  If a victim has obtained a restraining order, a copy of the order should be submitted to the University Police and they may assist in enforcing it. 

Services available to victim/survivors

The campus and surrounding community have a wide range of services available to help student victim/survivors. This information is always provided as part of prevention education efforts and is detailed at www.uww.edu/sexual-misconduct-information.

Additional services may be available elsewhere; this is a list of services most commonly accessed by UW-Whitewater students.

Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Stalking, and Sexual Assault Disciplinary Procedures for Student Perpetrators

A person may file a disciplinary complaint against a student by contacting the Dean of Students Office at 262-472-1533 or by visiting the Dean of Students Office in Hyer Hall 200.  Additionally, students have the right to report incidents to the University Police at 262-472-4660 or the police department where the crime occurred.  When someone reports they have been a victim of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, regardless if the offense occurred off campus, the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater will provide a written explanation of the person's rights and options, as well as all services available to the student or employee.

Disciplinary proceedings regarding dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking will include a prompt, fair, and impartial process from the initial investigation to the final result.  Investigating officers receive annual training on issues related to dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking as well as how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability. 

All alleged cases of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking investigated by the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater will follow UWS Chapter 17.11 Disciplinary Procedures if the alleged perpetrator (respondent) is a student, regardless of the type of incident.  The complainant will be invited to discuss the situation with the investigating officer who will then ask further questions. Additionally, a respondent will be requested to participate in a disciplinary conference, where:

Per UWS Chapter 17.11(2): an investigating officer shall promptly contact that student in person, by telephone, or by electronic mail to offer to discuss the matter with the student. The purpose of this discussion is to permit the investigating officer to review with the student the basis for his or her belief that the student engaged in nonacademic misconduct, and to afford the student an opportunity to respond. If the student does not respond to the investigating officer's offer to discuss the matter, the investigating officer may proceed to make a determination on the basis of the available information.

In addition to the disciplinary conference, the investigating officer may contact and interview complainants, witnesses or reporting parties, and/or acquire police or other campus reports that can aid in the investigation.  Campus investigations may proceed regardless of criminal investigations or proceedings, and may move forward more quickly.  In the event an investigation must be postponed while law enforcement gathers evidence, both the complainant and respondent will be notified.

If the investigating officer determines the preponderance of evidence standard is not met, per UWS Chapter 17.11 (3), the matter is considered resolved and both parties will be notified in writing simultaneously of the outcome.

If the investigating officer determines the preponderance of evidence standard is met, per UWS Chapter 17.11(4), the investigating officer will prepare a written report which will be distributed to both complainant and respondent containing a description of the alleged misconduct, information available that was used in making the decision, outcomes / sanctions, a notice of right to a hearing, and a copy of applicable policies & institutional procedures.

Preponderance of Evidence as defined by UWS 17.02(13) states:  "Preponderance of the evidence" means information that would persuade a reasonable person that a proposition is more probably true than not true. It is a lower standard of proof than "clear and convincing evidence" and is the standard for a finding of responsibility.

 

If the respondent chooses to request a hearing regarding the outcome, or if the outcome warrants suspension, expulsion, or enrollment restrictions, a disciplinary hearing will be scheduled, unless waived.  A disciplinary hearing may be heard by a hearing examiner, or hearing committee.

A hearing will be scheduled within 15 days of receipt of the request or written report, and will be conducted with 45 days.  When a hearing is scheduled, the investigating officer will provide in writing a full explanation of the facts upon which the determination of misconduct was based, and shall provide the student with access to or copies of the investigating officer's explanation, together with any other materials provided to the hearing examiner or committee by the investigating officer, including any additional available information per UWS 17.12(3). 

During a hearing, per Chapter 17.12(4)b:

The student shall have the right to question adverse witnesses, the right to present information and witnesses, the right to be heard on his or her own behalf, and the right to be accompanied by an advisor of the student's choice. The advisor may be a lawyer. In cases where the recommended disciplinary sanction is identified in s. UWS.17.10.1.a to h, (a written reprimand, denial of specified university privileges, payment of restitution, educational or service sanctions including community service, probation, imposition of reasonable terms and conditions on continued student status, removal from a course in progress, enrollment restrictions on a course or program) the advisor may counsel the student, but may not directly question adverse witnesses, present information or witnesses, or speak on behalf of the student except at the discretion of the hearing examiner or committee. In cases where the recommended disciplinary sanction is identified in s. UWS 17.10.1.i or j, or where the student has been charged with a crime in connection with the same conduct for which the disciplinary sanction is sought, the advisor may question adverse witnesses, present information and witnesses, and speak on behalf of the student. In accordance with the educational purposes of the hearing, the student is expected to respond on his or her own behalf to questions asked of him or her during the hearing.

Both the complainant and respondent have the right to have others present during any disciplinary proceeding, including any related meetings. 

After the hearing, the examiner or committee will prepare a decision within 14 days of the hearing, and deliver it to both complainant and respondent in writing.  Decisions regarding sanctions require a preponderance of evidence.  The outcome of the hearing becomes final within 14 days of the written decision, unless appealed under UWS Chapter 17.13.  Additionally, both the complainant and respondent will be notified of their appeal rights per UWS 17.13.  The University strives to complete the entire process within 60 days.

Per UWS 17.10, one or multiple of the following sanctions may be imposed as a result of a disciplinary proceeding for an allegation of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking:

·         A written reprimand

·         Denial of specified university privileges

·         Restitution

·         Educational or service sanctions, including community service

·         Disciplinary probation

·         Imposition of reasonable terms and conditions on continued student status

·         Removal from a course in progress

·         Enrollment restrictions on a course or program

·         Suspension

·         Expulsion

Protective measures offered to a complainant following a report of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking include:

·         Alternate housing accommodations, if reasonably available

·         No contact directives issued by the Dean of Students Office to the respondent

·         Alternate class, work, and transportation accommodations, if reasonably available

·         Assistance with notifying law enforcement

·         Assistance in obtaining protective orders (help with filing a restraining order)

·         Counseling and health services

These accommodations will be made whenever they are reasonably available whether the incident is reported to police or not.  Victims will be provided with written information regarding these accommodations.

To maintain integral and open communication during the misconduct process, UW-Whitewater will simultaneously notify the complainant and respondent of any disciplinary actions that arise from allegations of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking.  Additionally, both parties will be notified in writing of any changes in results and the date at which results become final.  Compliance with these provisions does not constitute a violation of section 444 of the General Education Provisions Act (20 U.S.C. 1232g), commonly known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA).

UW-Whitewater will protect the confidentiality of victims and witnesses as follows:

  • Names of victims will not be publicly released.
  • Cleary Act reporting and other reporting requirements will not include names or other identifying information.
  • Accommodations and protective measures will be provided while maintaining as much confidentiality as possible.

Employee and Third Party Offenders

 Procedures for Institutional Disciplinary Action for Employees in Cases of Alleged Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, or Stalking for Faculty, Staff, and University Staff

Employee Disciplinary Procedures

University employees are subject to disciplinary procedures and sanc­tions for sexual misconduct including sexual assault, sexual harassment, dat­ing violence, domestic violence and stalking committed on university prop­erty or during work time, up to and including termination of employment. Disciplinary sanctions are initiated and imposed in accordance with applica­ble procedural requirements and work rules, as set forth in Wisconsin stat­utes, administrative rules, faculty and academic staff policies, and collective bargaining agreements. Referral for prosecution under criminal law is also possible and is a standard procedure in cases of sexual assault.

The University of Wisconsin System UPS Operational Policy: GEN 28 - "Sexual Misconduct" provides the UW-System policy on sexual misconduct.  (https://www.wisconsin.edu/ohrwd/download/gen28.pdf )  The purpose of this policy is to establish a policy on reporting sexual misconduct and on the need to comply with the federal law that requires UW System institutions to provide certain procedural rights to individuals who assert that they were harmed as a result of sexual misconduct by a university staff member.  "Sexual misconduct" under this policy includes sexual assault, sexual harassment, gender-based stalking, and relationship violence. 

UW-Whitewater has three major categories of employees: faculty, academic staff, and university staff. If you wish to report an employee or third party for alleged sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence or stalking, contact the Title IX Coordinator, 262-472-5669 or the UW-Whitewater Police Services, 262-472-4660.

 

Each of the categories for employees has distinct procedures for discipline and dismissal, which are provided below.

                                                                          

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

For complaints involving sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking, the chancellor, or designee, shall appoint the Title IX Coordinator, or designee

 

(1)     To initiate an investigation in accordance with applicable policies.

 

The chancellor, or designee,

a.        Shall also offer to discuss the matter informally with the complainant, and provide information of rights under either UWS 4 or UWS 11.

b.       Both the accused and the complainant shall have the right to be accompanied by an advisor of their choice at any meeting or proceedings that is part of the institutional disciplinary process.

c.        An employee may be dismissed only after receipt of a written statement of specific charges from the chancellor as the chief administrative officer of the institution and, a hearing can be requested by employee, in accordance with the provisions.

d.       If the employee does not request a hearing, action shall proceed along normal administrative lines.

 

(2)     Any formal statement of specific charges for dismissal sent to an employee shall be accompanied by a statement of the appeal procedures available to the employee.

 

(3)     The statement of charges shall be served personally or by certified mail, return receipt requested.

 

If the statement of charges involves sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking, the statement shall be provided to the complainant upon request, except as may be precluded by applicable state or federal law.

 

The discipline and dismissal procedures for faculty and academic staff members were developed through shared-governance processes. The discipline and dismissal procedures for university staff are based upon regulations and guidance issued by the Wisconsin Office of State Employee Relations.

 

Whenever the Chancellor the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater receives a complaint against a faculty member which he/she deems substantial and which, if true, might lead to dismissal under s. UWS 4.01, the chancellor shall within a reasonable time initiate an investigation and shall, prior to reaching a decision on filing charges, offer to discuss the matter informally with the faculty member. A faculty member may be dismissed only after receipt of a written statement of specific charges from the chancellor as the chief administrative officer of the institution and, if a hearing is requested by the faculty member, in accordance with the provisions of this policy. If the faculty member does not request a hearing, action shall proceed along normal administrative lines but the provisions of ss. UWS 4.02, 4.09, and 4.10 shall still apply.

UWS 4.02(2)

Any formal statement of specific charges for dismissal sent to a faculty member shall be accompanied by a statement of the appeal procedures available to the faculty member.

UWS 4.02(3)The statement of charges shall be served personally or by certified mail, return receipt requested. If such service cannot be made within 20 days, service shall be accomplished by first class mail and by publication as if the statement of charges were a summons and the provisions of s. 801.11 (1) (c), Stats., were applicable.

Whenever the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin receives a written allegation which concerns an academic staff member holding an indefinite appointment which appears to be substantial and which, if true, might lead to dismisssal under UWW 6.01, the Chancellor shall request within (20) working days that the appropriate dean or division head investigate the allegation,  offer to discuss it formally with the individual, and provide information of rights to which members of the academic staff are entitled under this chapter.  If such an investigation and discussion does not result in a resolution of the allegation, and if the allegation is deemed sufficiently serioius to warrant dismissal, the dean or division head shall prepare a written statement of specific charges.  A member of the academic staff may be dismissed only after receipt of such a statement of specific charges, and if a hearing is requested by the academic staff member, after a hearing held in accordance with the provisions of this policy shall apply.  In those cases where the immediate supervisor of the academic staff member concerned is a dean or division head, the Chancellor shall, to avoid potential prejudice, designate an appropriate admisistrative officer to act for the dean or division head under this section. 

Any formal statement of specific charges shall be served personally or by certified mail, return receipt requested.  If such service cannot be made within twenty (20) working days, service shall be accomplished by first class mail and by publication as if the statement of charges were a summons and the provisions of Section 262.06 (1) (c), Wis Stats. were applicable.

Engaging in one or more forms of prohibited conduct by a university staff employee of the University of Wisconsin System may result in disciplinary action ranging from a reprimand to immediate discharge, depending upon the specific form of conduct and/or the number of infractions, pursuant to s. 230.34, Wis. Stats. and Wis. Adm. Code section ER 46, or pursuant to existing collective bargaining agreements.

 

 

Standard of Evidence

 

In the case of campus disciplinary pro­cedures, both the accuser and the ac­cused in a case involving allegations of a sex offense are entitled to the same opportunities to have an advisor pres­ent at any institutional misconduct hearing. In all cases involving alleged sexual harassment or sexual assault, the standard of proof is the “preponderance of the evidence” standard, which means information that would persuade a rea­sonable person that a proposition is more probably true than not true. The accuser has the same right of appeal in a disciplinary proceeding as the accused.

 

Possible Sanctions

Any employee found responsible for sex-based misconduct may receive any of the following sanctions:

·         Letter of warning

·         Official reprimand

·         Referral to a required counseling program

·         Suspension from employment with pay

·         Suspension from employment without pay

·         Termination from employment

·         Training on Sex-Based Misconduct.

Any third party (visitor, guest, contractor, subcontractor, vendor, partner, or business affiliate) found responsible for sex-based misconduct will receive a sanction ranging from a written warning to being banned from any University property, activities, and/or programs, including the termination of any business contract with the University.

Statement of Policy

 

The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater (UW-W) does not discriminate on the basis of sex in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics and other college-administered programs or in its employment practices. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX), 20 U.S.C. §§ 1681 et seq., and its implementing regulations, 34 C.F.R. Part 106, prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs or activities operated by recipients of Federal financial assistance.

 

The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater is a community that stands for safe, healthy relationships. As such, it is the policy of the University to foster a campus environment that is free from intimidation and one in which students may be educated to their fullest potential. Therefore, the University will not tolerate rape, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking, and any form of sexual harassment from students, faculty, or staff. The University also encourages reporting of any incident related to these offences.

 

The annual and ongoing prevention and awareness programs for faculty and staff to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking and to promote campus awareness include the following online trainings. The presentations, updates on the UW-Whitewater sexual misconduct information website, campus announcements from the Chancellor, and campus-wide webinars promote campus awareness. These programs are comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming, initiatives, and strategies. The Campus Answers/Workplace Answers provide Title IX Training that is thorough and simple to implement. The programs are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, and responsive to community needs. As noted in the course benefits, “Preventing Sexual Harassment” is designed to educate employees to recognize sex discrimination, and help employees protect against sexual violence. The program also sends strong messages that sex discrimination and violence are prohibited by the university, and explain the importance of reporting sex discrimination promptly.

 

A.      The programs directed at new employee training and awareness programs include:

·         “Preventing Sexual Harassment” online training by Campus Answers/Workplace Answers, mandated for all new faculty, staff, and university staff.

·         “Preventing Discrimination and Sexual Violence: Title IX, VAWA and Clery Act for Non-Residential Faculty and Staff” online course training by Campus Answers/Workplace Answers for all employees for academic year 2016-2017.

·         Title IX Notice of Nondiscrimination posters are available at the informational tables at the Dean of Students and the University Health & Counseling Services at the Annual Involvement Fair at the beginning of the academic year.

·         Title IX Notice of Nondiscrimination flyers are included in the benefit packages for Benefit Orientation Programs for new employees

·         Presentations at the fall college retreats by the Title IX Coordinator, Deputy Title IX Coordinator, and Wellness Coordinator on the “UW-Whitewater Employee Reporting Mandates”

 

B.      Campus-wide Presentations  on “Obligations Under Title IX & Responding to Sexual Misconduct” training to the following colleges and units on campus during 2014-2015:

·         Faculty Senate

·         First Year Faculty Program

·         Multicultural Affairs & Student Success

·         Student Affairs Leadership Team

·         College of Education & Professional Studies Admin Council Meeting

·         College of Arts & Communication Admin Council Meeting

·         Music Department

·         Campus-wide Open Session on Title IX

·         College of Letters & Sciences Admin Council Meeting

·         Alumni Relations & Development

·         Administrative Affairs Directors

·         CSAC Advisory Council

·         College of Business & Economics

·         Academic Staff Assembly

·         University Health & Counseling Services

·         Facilities Planning & Management

·         Marketing & Media Relations

·         Special Education Department

 

C.      Sexual Misconduct Information Website

 

D.      “It On Us” video (Marketing & Media Relations)

 

E.       Campus Announcements: Letter from the Chancellor on Title IX and sexual assault reporting and prevention at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters each year.

 

F.       Campus Wide Webinars:

·         Webinar: “Combatting Campus Sexual Violence: Complying with the Final VAWA Rules”, sponsored by Campus Answers, November 13, 2014

·         Webinar: Investigating & Adjudicating Faculty Sexual Misconduct; Title IX Considerations”, December 3, 2014 sponsored by PaperClip Communications.

·         Webinar: Title IX/VAWA & Your First Year Students, Maximize Your Impact During Their First 15 Days & Beyond” Thursday, April 16, 2015, sponsored by PaperClip Communications

·         Webinar: Interrupting Violence on Campus: Engaging Men as Allies, Wednesday, June 17, 2015

·         Webinar: July 1 VAWA Updates: Our Compliance Audit, June 25, 2015

·         Webinar: How to Tackle all Campus SaVE Challenges with Campus Clarity, Tuesday, July 14, 2015 sponsored by Campus Clarity.

 

G.      Title IX Coordinating Team: campus areas represented: Title IX Coordinator; Deputy Title IX Coordinator & Dean of Students; Senior Women Administrator and Athletic Director, Intercollegiate Athletics; Wellness Coordinator; Chief of Protective Services; Professor & Faculty Senate Representative; Chair/Professor of Women Studies; Budget & Policy Analyst; Health Services Director; Director of HR & D; and Associate Director of Residence Life.

 


 

The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater (UWW) prohibits the crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, or other forms of sexual misconduct. Offenders may be subject to appropriate campus adjudication processes, disciplinary action, and/or criminal proceedings. UWW utilizes procedures that provide prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and resolution in cases involving domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. These procedures are carried out by officials who receive specific annual training.

Sexual Harassment Policy:

 

DEFINITION BY UW-SYSTEM


Sexual harassment is defined by the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents as follows:

Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination. It occurs in a variety of situations which share a common element: the inappropriate introduction of sexual activities or comments into the work or learning situation. Often, sexual harassment involves relationships of unequal power, and contains elements of coercion--as when compliance with requests for sexual favors becomes criterion for granting work, study, or grading benefits. However, sexual harassment may also involve relationships among equals, as when repeated sexual advances or demeaning verbal behavior have a harmful effect on a person's ability to study or work in the academic setting. For general purposes, sexual harassment may be described as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other physical conduct and expressive behavior of a sexual nature where: 

  1. Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or education; 
     
  2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for academic or employment decisions affecting that individual; or 
     
  3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's academic or professional performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or demeaning employment or educational environment.  

Any of the forms of sexual harassment (as defined above) may be grounds for disciplinary action. Discretion must be used in each situation and action taken within the established procedures. The definition provides a base of understanding for all. 
 

 

 PROCEDURES

  1. When any employee or student has reason to believe that they have been sexually harassed, they should contact the Assistant to the Chancellor for Equal Opportunity and Diversity or designee. 
     
  2. Any employee or faculty member who comes to know that another student, employee or faculty member is concerned about, or knows another who is concerned about, being sexually harassed, should refer that individual(s) to the Assistant to the Chancellor or designee, contact 472-5669. 
     
  3. The Assistant to the Chancellor or designee is prepared to discuss the events, feelings or perceptions creating the concern. These informal discussions may lead to four possible actions depending on the facts presented and the wishes of the offended individual. Identities of complainants do not have to be made known without their prior approval in the informal action. 
     
  4. The Chancellor may be informed at the informal stage. The Chancellor may request specific information at this time, and will be provided with updates. 
     
  5. The Assistant to the Chancellor or designee can seek to determine, after any initial complaints, whether retaliation or further harassment has occurred. 
     
  6. Informal Procedures: 
     
    1. No Action 
       
      1. The actions fall outside the definition of sexual harassment, or 
         
      2. The offended individual decides against, or the Assistant to the Chancellor does not consider further action appropriate. 
         
    2. Informal Indirect Action 
       
      1. When there has been no education of the unit in which the offending individual works, the Assistant to the Chancellor will arrange to provide education on sexual harassment, what it is and why it is illegal in the workplace. 
         
      2. The goal will be to "send a clear message" to the offending individual without confronting him or her nor assuming knowledge that offense has been given. 
         
    3. Informal Direct Action 
       
      1. A "friendly" meeting is arranged to permit the Assistant to the Chancellor or designee to convey the concerns of the offended individual to the offender with the goal of stopping the behavior. 
         
      2. The Assistant to the Chancellor or designee will present the problem, gather any additional information, attempt to resolve the situation and/or provide education on sexual harassment. 
         
      3. The offending individual may have a third person present at the informal meeting, will be informed of possible subsequent actions and also has the right to confidentiality during the initial informal phase. 
         
  7. Formal Procedures: This is the formal complaint stage, and commences at the request of the offended individual and 
     
    1. The informal indirect action did not stop the harassment or retaliation occurred; 
       
    2. the case is deemed serious enough, after investigation, by the Assistant to the Chancellor, or 
       
    3. punitive action is sought by the offended individual. 
       
    4. if the complaining individual is a student, procedures for Wisc.Stat. 36.12, Non-Discrimination Against Students, applies (see U.H. IV-K, p.1-3); if a faculty member or academic staff member, Affirmative Action Grievance Procedure, Unclassified Personnel, U.H. VI-D, p. 5; if classified staff, Affirmative Action Grievance Procedures, Classified Personnel, U.H.VI-D p.6. 

 

University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Investigation Process

For Employees and Third Parties

Related to Sexual Assault, Dating/Domestic Violence, and Stalking Allegations

Reflects the Title IX Requirements

 

Accused is a UW-Whitewater Employee

 

1.       The complainant files a complaint that is written, signed dated, timely filed (within 60 days of the alleged complaint and contains an allegation that represents an issue over which the Title IX Coordinator has jurisdiction.

 

2.       Once accepted, the Title IX Coordinator notifies the complainant by letter of the issues to be investigated. Concurrently, the University is informed of the complaint, and a date request is made. The complainant’s name is not contained in the text of either letter.

 

3.       The Title IX Coordinator reviews the response from the University and conducts, as needed, oral interviews.

 

4.       A finding is made based on the information collected as to whether there is sufficient or insufficient evidence to determine that the alleged action occurred. The Title IX Coordinator uses a preponderance of evidence standard in making the decision..

 

5.       Letters are prepared for all parties detailing the results of the investigation and explaining the basis for making the determination.

 

6.       If the Title IX Coordinator determines there is the possibility of misconduct, the matter is brought to the attention of the appropriate school, college or unit to attempt to remedy the problem.

 

7.       If the Title IX Coordinator determines there is insufficient evidence, the complainant can appeal to the Chancellor if a student or to the Provost if a faculty or staff member, or to Human Resources and Diversity. Options for filing complaints with the state and Federal governments, if appropriate, are explained.

Ongoing Primary Prevention and Awareness Campaigns:

The University engages in comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies, and campaigns intended to end dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking that:

·         Are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and informed by research, or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and

·         Consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community and societal levels

Educational programming consists of primary prevention and awareness programs for all incoming students and ongoing awareness and prevention campaigns for students that:

a.       Identifies domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking as prohibited conduct;

b.      Defines using definitions provided both by the Department of Education as well as state law what behavior constitutes domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking;

c.       Defines what behavior and actions constitute consent to sexual activity using the definition of consent found above;

d.      Provides a description of safe and positive options for bystander intervention. Bystander intervention means safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking. Bystander intervention includes recognizing situations of potential harm, understanding institutional structures and cultural conditions that facilitate violence, overcoming barriers to intervening, identifying safe and effective intervention options, and taking action to intervene;

e.      Information on risk reduction. Risk reduction means options designed to decrease perpetration and bystander inaction, and to increase empowerment for victims in order to promote safety and to help individuals and communities address conditions that facilitate violence.

f.        Provides an overview of information contained in the Annual Security Report in compliance with the Clery Act.

Annual and Ongoing Prevention and Awareness Programs

UWW has developed an annual educational campaign consisting of presentations, workshops, and multi-media campaigns that include distribution of educational materials to new students, and participating in and presenting information and materials during new employee orientation.

The University offered the following primary prevention and awareness programs during the 2014-2015 academic year as follows:

1.       Agent of Change: During the fall of 2014 UWW implemented a new way of providing training to new students. Freshman and transfer students were strongly encouraged to complete the Agent of Change program and 370 students (a 17% response rate) completed the online training to learn about sexual assault, relationship violence, sexual harassment, and stalking. The program was designed to meet the requirements of the Campus SaVE Act. A committee will be working on further developing this program and finding ways to improve the response rate.

2.       Sex Signals: First-year students are a special target audience and specific steps are taken to ensure that this group receives the required information. Over 80% of new students attended the Sex Signals program at orientation in the Fall of 2014. The Sex Signals program incorporates improvisation humor, education, and audience interaction to provide a provocative look at dating, sex, stalking, bystander intervention, and consent. At this time, freshman were introduced to several area resources by meeting a UWW Police Officer, a counselor at UWW and an advocate from the Association for the Prevention of Family Violence.

3.       Resident Assistants and Peer Mentors: Two groups of student workers, Resident Assistants and Peer Mentors, receive additional training because they work closely with a large number of students. Approximately 150 Resident Assistants (RAs) and other Residence Life staff participated in an “experiential learning” activity where they were given a scenario regarding sexual assault.  University Health and Counseling Services and Wellness staff were present to provide information and help RAs develop skills to assist students who came to the RA for assistance. Additionally, the RAs attended a presentation that focused on sexual violence issues and bystander intervention. Similarly, 80 Peer Mentors received training on sexual assault, dating violence, bystander intervention and consent. Each Freshman seminar class is assigned a Peer Mentor. Peer Mentors also utilized a video that was created by UWW (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLrU0uPw3KE).

4.       Mass Email: In the Fall of 2014 all students attending the university received an email that contained links to the sexual misconduct webpage that describes the sexual assault, harassment and stalking definitions and penalties, UW-Whitewater disciplinary process and sanctions, national and campus statistics, victim services, victim rights, self-protection strategies, bystander intervention strategies, location of self-defense courses, phone numbers and web sites for assistance or more information. Additionally, students received an electronic handout (this handout was also widely distributed across campus in print form) that serves as an ‘at a glance’ flyer with pertinent information. Students received the required information through their campus email address because that is where they receive other essential university information. In a survey, students indicated that they want to receive information on sexual assault and their preferred method was through a link on the campus website rather than sending out a paper booklet as has been done in the past.  Students have access to the link throughout the academic year.

5.       University Police Presentations: During the Fall 2014 semester, the University Police presented 126 programs to 15,207 people within the campus, city, county, regional and state communities. Many of these programs include information about dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking including what to do if an individual is a victim of these crimes and tips on preventing these crimes from occurring (including personal safety, not perpetrating and bystander intervention).

6.       Invisible War Screening: At this film screening, resources were shared to ensure that attendees learn about forms of sexual misconduct and what to do if victimized.

7.       Guest Speaker Series: Jeff Bucholtz visited UWW and educated 480 members of our campus community. Jeff is an activist and expert in the fields of sexual violence, relationship violence, gender normativity, violence prevention, and stalking and is co-president of the San Diego Domestic Violence Council. His presentations were incredibly well-received by employees and students alike. Attendees agreed that they identified new ways to help raise awareness, support survivors and intervene in potentially risky situations.

8.       Student Health 101: UWW has utilized the Student Health 101 e-health magazine for a number of years. This year, Student Health 101 has included an article in each monthly addition that addressed sexual assault (Profile of a Perpetrator, Profile of a Bystander, Profile of a Friend and Guide to Reporting a Sexual Assault). Over 1,000 UWW students read Student Health 101 each month. The inclusion of these articles has greatly increased awareness of sexual assault prevention, protective behaviors and helping survivors.

9.       It’s On Us Campaign: In February 2015 the It’s On Us campaign was utilized at UWW. UWW created a video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_evGhpbKyA) that was shown in classrooms and at athletic events. The video was shared on social media pages and sharing of the video was encouraged. The total views on the YouTube page jumped from less than 100 to over 1,400 in less than 24 hours. It is estimated that well over 4,000 students viewed this video. Additionally, Marketing and Media Relations and University Health and Counseling Services partnered to utilize a multi-method approach to share the bystander intervention messages that were part of this campaign. The messages were included on print materials (150 posters), t-shirts (450 shirts were distributed), electronic sign boards and social media outlets. At least 22 UW-Whitewater affiliated Facebook pages changed their profile image to the purple It’s On Us logo. UW-Whitewater students and staff utilized #itsonus and #warhawkfamily hashtags to share photos of themselves wearing the t-shirts. This helped guide UWW community members to the national website and pledge.

10.   ‘Windows to Whitewater’: All new students receive a publication titled ‘Windows to Whitewater’ that provides information about services on campus. This year, information on safety and survivor resources in relation to sexual assault was included in the ‘Windows to Whitewater’ publication.

11.   Supporting A Violence-free Environment (SAVE): SAVE is a student organization of over 12 members that strives to raise awareness through on-campus events and programs. SAVE completes many activities including: sponsoring the annual Take Back the Night program; tabling at the University Center; using sidewalk chalk, posters and t-shirts to raise awareness about interpersonal violence.

12.   Button/Wristband Contest: University Health & Counseling Services sponsors an annual design contest. Students are able to design buttons with messages that raise awareness about sexual assault. The winning designs are used and buttons and wristbands are distributed to UWW students.

13.   Brochures: Brochures on sexual assault definitions and penalties, national and campus statistics, victim services, victim rights, self-protection strategies, bystander intervention, stalking, phone numbers and web sites for assistance or more information were available at several sites around campus throughout the year, at special events and during class presentations.

14.   Sexual Misconduct Website: Throughout the year, extensive information was available on the Sexual Misconduct Information website (www.uww.edu/sexual-misconduct-information), which was advertised in brochures and on posters, laminated cards for team members’ offices and display cases at the University Health and Counseling Services and the University Center.  Topics on the site include: what to do if you have been assaulted, local and campus resources, statistics, health care options, counseling services available, the role of alcohol and other drugs, behaviors that are considered sexual assault, the law in Wisconsin, legal options – criminal and disciplinary, victim rights, sex offender registry, Wisconsin stalking and harassment laws, advice for friends/family, prevention, suggested readings, links to state and national resources.  The search engine on the UW-Whitewater website directs all students looking for information on sexual assault or rape to the Sexual Misconduct Information web page. Additionally, the University Health and Counseling Services Facebook and Twitter accounts are used to post relevant information about accessing resources for sexual assault survivors.  This helps to ensure that students will be repeatedly exposed to the information and know how to receive assistance for sexual assault as needed. Additional information is available on the University Health and Counseling Services and University Police websites.



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