Current PIE Courses Offered

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Courses that count toward general education elective requirements at UW-Whitewater have one of the following designations: GA (Creative Arts), GH (Humanities), GL (Natural Sciences-Laboratory), GQ (Quantitative Reasoning), and GS (Social and Behavior Sciences). UW-Whitewater students are required to earn 7-11 credits in quantitative and technical reasoning (including one 4-5 credit laboratory science) and 8-12 credits in general education electives.

ART STUDIO 121 BASIC ART (GA)
An introductory studio course for non-art majors and minors covering the basic concepts and materials of major visual arts.

BIOLOGY 214 ECOLOGY AND SOCIETY (GM) 3 Units
A study of basic ecological concepts and their application to the identification, understanding, and abatement of contemporary environmental problems. Special emphasis is given to those problems resulting from man and his activities. This course is accepted as a course in conservation required for teacher licensure in the sciences.

CHEMISTRY 102 INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY (GL)
An introduction to the general concepts of chemistry including matter and energy, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, reactions and stoichiometry, gas laws, changes of state, thermochemistry, acid-base theory, solutions, colloids, kinetics, equilibria and electrochemistry.

CHEMISTRY 104 INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY (GL)
A continuation of CHEM 102.

COMM 110 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN COMMUNICATION
A basic course designed to help students increase their effectiveness in public speaking and interpersonal communication through learning current theory and developing skills through actual classroom experiences. A beginning course in principles of oral communication designed to develop confidence and precision through classroom speaking.

COMPSCI 171 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING (GQ)
An introduction to computer programming and its applications to science, business and education. Opportunity for extensive experience in designing and writing structured programs in the Visual Basic language.

COMPSCI 172 INTRODUCTION TO JAVA (GQ)
This course will give students the essentials of object-oriented programming in Java. Students will learn to formulate algorithms, to solve problems and to implement those solutions with a Java program that employs objects and classes. The student will be introduced to object-oriented design, applications and applets, class construction, methods and message passing arrays, string processing, file processing, and some event-handling and Graphical Use Interface programming. This course is designed for students with some prior programming experience.

COMPSCI 220 INTERMEDIATE JAVA
This course teaches more advanced topics in object-oriented program design and the Java programming language. Coverage includes multi-dimensional arrays, methods, error handling, strings, regular expressions, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, generic types, program debugging and testing, database and file processing, event-handling, and graphical user interfaces. Unreq: MCS 220 and COMPSCI 222
PREREQ: COMPSCI 172 OR (COMPSCI 174 AND CONSENT OF INSTRUCTOR)

ENGLISH 101 FRESHMAN ENGLISH
An introduction to the reading and writing of college-level prose. Study of short stories, novels and essays. Composition of short papers and essay examinations.

ENGLISH 263 THE CONTEMPORARY NOVEL (GH)
A study of significant British and American novels and novelists of the last decade.

ENGLISH 274 CREATIVE WRITING (GH)
Study, discussion and writing of description, narration, verse and the short story.

EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS 230 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
The focus of this course is the study of human development and change throughout the entire lifespan from psychological, sociological, and biological perspectives.

FRENCH 251 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH (GH)
Grammar review, reading, oral and written exercises, conversation.

FRENCH 252 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH (GH)
Continuation of French 251

GERMAN 251 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN (GH)
Systematic deepening and improving of the four language skills with emphasis on the grammatical structure. Selected reading.

GERMAN 252 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN (GH)
Continuation of German 252

MATH 143 FINITE \MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES  (GQ)
Mathematical preparation for the understanding of various quantitative methods in modern management and social sciences. Topics included are sets, relations, linear functions, interest, annuities, matrix theory, the solution of linear systems by the graphical, algebraic, Gauss-Jordan, and inverse methods, linear programming by graphical and simplex methods, counting and probability, and decision theory. College of Business and Economics majors must take this course on a conventional grade basis.

MATH 230 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS  (GQ)
A pre-calculus course in statistics. Descriptive statistics, probability distributions, prediction, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. This course does not count towards a mathematics major or minor in either liberal arts or secondary education or towards a mathematics minor in elementary education. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has been or is being earned in any other statistics course.

MATH 253 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I (GQ)
Review of algebraic and trigonometric functions, transcendental functions, limits, study of the derivative, techniques of differentiation, continuity, applications of the derivative, L' Hopital's Rule and indeterminate forms, the Riemann integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and substitution rule.
PREREQ: MATH 152 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER OR EQUIVALENT HIGH SCHOOL PREPARATION AS DETERMINED BY THE MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT.

MATH 254 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II 5 Units
Techniques of integration, applications of the integral, introduction to differential equations, polar coordinates and conic sections, infinite sequences and series. This course includes a writing component.
PREREQ: MATH 250 WITH A GRADE OF B OR BETTER OR MATH 253 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER

MATH 255 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY III
Solid analytic geometry, vectors and vector functions, functions of several variables, multiple integrals and their applications.

MATH 280 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
This course will supply a thorough grounding in the mathematical topics which are central to the study of computer science, and which form the basis for many modern applications of mathematics to the social sciences. Topics covered will include sets, logic, Boolean algebra and switching circuits, combinatorics, probability, graphs, trees, recursion, and algorithm analysis. Expressing mathematical ideas and writing proofs will be emphasized.

MATH 355 MATRICES AND LINEAR ALGEBRA
Systems of linear equations, matrices and determinants, finite dimensional vector spaces, linear dependence, bases, dimension, linear mappings, orthogonal bases, and eigenvector theory. Applications stressed throughout.
PREREQ: OR MATH 253 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER

POLISCI 141 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS  (GS)
An introductory course covering the history, structure and functioning of American national government and its relation to state and local government.

SPANISH 251 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH (GH)
Grammar review, reading, oral and written exercises. Conversation.

SPANISH 252 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH (GH)
Continuation of SPANISH 251.

SPECED 205 PSYCHOLOGY OF THE EXCEPTIONAL CHILD
The purpose of this course is to help students explore issues and perspectives related to basic theories in special education. The course also examines the legal and ethical implications surrounding special education, and the historical developments within the field. This course will provide teacher education students with experiences that engage them in explicitly examining their conceptions, assumptions, and attitudes related to students with exceptional educational needs. Extensive consideration will be devoted to misconceptions about multicultural and bilingual aspects of special education as well as pedagogical approaches for including students with diverse learning styles and abilities in general education environments