Sociology

Contact Information

Paul Gregory
Department Chair
Phone: (262) 472-1984
Location: Laurentide 2110

Pete Killoran
Lecturer, Master Adviser
Phone: (262) 472-1422
Location: Laurentide 2134

Mande Zierath
Academic Department Associate
Phone: (262) 472-1133
Location: Laurentide 2112

Sociology Courses

  • INTRODUCTION TO PEACE AND SOCIAL JUSTICE
    Sociology 200, Credits: 3

    Introduction to Peace and Social Justice teaches an interdisciplinary approach to understanding peace -- as more than the absence of war. It explores mulitple ways to create the conditions where social justice can flourish from global to local levels. Themes: non-violence, conflict resolution, human rights, environmental sustainability, and social inequallity

  • PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY (GS)
    Sociology 240, Credits: 3

    This course introduces students to the ways in which sociologists use theory and research to study human group behavior and the processes by which people build, maintain, and change their institutional arrangements and relationships with one another. The course will focus on five areas of inquiry: social structure, interaction, and change; inequality and diversity; family and health; crime, criminal justice, and law; and global comparative.

  • SOCIAL PROBLEMS (GS)
    Sociology 250, Credits: 3

    This course examines various theoretical explanations of contemporary social problems such as crime, drug use, poverty, discrimination and environmental pollution. The impact of social problems on different groups in society and the role of social movements, government, and social policy are considered.

  • INTRODUCTION TO FAMILY STUDIES (GS)
    Sociology 252, Credits: 3

    This course emphasizes the influence of gender, race/ethnicity, and class on family and marriage in comtemporary U.S. society. It introduces students to theories and research that explain social forces affecting family commitments, and familiarizes them with varying social and cultural patterns of family formation.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF SCIENCE FICTION
    Sociology 255, Credits: 3

    Science Fiction offers a unique view of contemporary culture and society, making penetrating observations about the relationship between the individual and society, gaining insights into social structure, culture, values, social conflict, social change and social problems. Through novels and film, the course stimulates discussion, critical and analytical thinking.

  • RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS (DV) (GS)
    Sociology 265, Credits: 3

    This course examines relationships between racial minorities and the majority group in the United States in their socio-historical contexts. Early histories of relations between minorities and the majority as well as present relations will be addressed. Questions raised include whether American society should attempt to minimize differences between minorities and the majority, whether to blend or maintain group identities, and how we should address existing barriers and inequalities. Relationships and differences among minority groups will also be examined.

  • THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY: A SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE (DV) (GS)
    Sociology 270, Credits: 3

    This course provides lower level undergraduate students with systematic sociological understanding of the historical and current experiences of African American people.

  • INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY (GS)
    Sociology 276, Credits: 3

    An introduction to the field of criminology through examination of theories and patterns of criminal behavior, the operation of the criminal justice system, and the politics of crime control policy.

  • ASIAN AMERICANS (DV) (GS)
    Sociology 285, Credits: 3

    The course examines the intersection of Asia and United States through peoples who migrated from Asia. It reviews issues of race and ethnicity and provides an overview in Asian cultures so that students can understand Asian American diversity and Asian cultures of orgin. It examines the diverse experiences of the various Asian peoples who have migrated to the U.S.

  • TRAVEL STUDY
    Sociology 291, Credits: 1-3

    Variable topics. Group activity oriented presentations emphasizing `hands on` and participatory instructional techniques. Prereq: 3 credits of Political Science, Sociology, Global Perspectives, Individual and Society and consent of instructor.

  • BASIC SOCIAL STATISTICS
    Sociology 295, Credits: 3

    Introduction to basic statistical methods and their utility in sociology including statistical concepts, frequency distribution, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation analysis, OLS regression analysis, and including the logic of hypothesis testing. In addition, introduction to basic operations of PASW (formally SPSS) statistical software in social data analysis.

  • CULTURE, MEDICINE AND HEALTH
    Sociology 302, Credits: 3

    Medical anthropologists apply critical concepts and ethnographic methods to understand the lived experience of illness and suffering; differing medical practices; and the various ways modern healthcare impacts societies. This course is an introduction to the field and designed for students in the social sciences, humanities, and biological/health sciences.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH AND ILLNESS
    Sociology 310, Credits: 3

    This course examines the sociocultural aspects of health and illness, the patient-practitioner relationship, the socialization of health practitioners, the social organization of health care services, and the role of ethics in medical decision-making. It analyzes the problems and inequities in our present system of health care delivery in the United States, with particular emphasis on the sexism, racism, and classism in policy and practice. It analyzes alternative models of health care delivery, and discusses modifications in policy and practice necessary to bring about change.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF DISABILITY
    Sociology 315, Credits: 3

    Sociology of Disability is an examination of the social construction of disability, including its historical and cross-cultural variations, institutional and organizational contexts, and interactional and emotional dimensions. Particular attention is given to the experience of living with various biomedical conditions and the ways in which the social status of disability is related to other forms of social inequality and difference.

  • ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
    Sociology 319, Credits: 3

    This course examines the economic and political structures that have induced natural environmental degradation throughout the world and highlights the impact of collective social actors mobilizing to influence the process of environmental policy formation in order to address environmental and technological risks.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF NATURAL DISASTERS
    Sociology 321, Credits: 3

    This course examines the impact of natural events from a sociological perspective, including hurricanes and earthquakes in which a relatively self-sufficient community undergoes severe physical destruction and incurs in financial loses and the loss of community. Agency and governmental response to disaster emergencies will also be considered.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF NEWS AND THE MASS MEDIA
    Sociology 337, Credits: 3

    Sociology of News and the Mass Media examines the emergence of news organizations and the mass media as specialized subsystems within modern society and explores the interrelations between them and other social institutions and their impact on modern culture.

  • SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR
    Sociology 340, Credits: 3

    An examination of the causes and consequences of social movements and collective behavior, including such phenomena as riots; fads; panic; trade unions; reform, revolutionary, and liberation movements; utopian communities.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF FAMILY AND WORK
    Sociology 342, Credits: 3

    This course reviews the relationship between the social institutions of family and workplace. It examines how they interact with each other, and how key social factors such as gender, class, job type and culture affect that interaction.

  • RACE, ETHNICITY AND FILM (DV)
    Sociology 344, Credits: 3

    This course will sociologically analyze racial and ethnic patterns in American films. We will discuss how decision-makers shape the public imagination. We will examine how race intersects with other identities in ways that lead to specific trends in Hollywood. We will highlight the relationship between media, culture and the economy.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER
    Sociology 345, Credits: 3

    This course will analyze gender as a process and as a social institution. It will examine how we can experience gender in ways that maintain existing gender relations or in ways that challenge them.

  • GENDER AND FAMILY IN JAPAN
    Sociology 347, Credits: 3

    This course will examine forms of masculinity, femininity, sexuality, and family in contemporary Japan, and their historical development. Students will learn how gender, sexuality, and family are historically and socially constructed, how they are recreated through social interaction, how power inequalities are embedded in gender and family relations, how these inequalities impact individuals (and vice versa).

  • CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE SOCIETY
    Sociology 350, Credits: 3

    This course examines contemporary Japanese society. It includes a study of social institutions, processes, and culture of Japan. the course examines following areas: (a) culture (beliefs, customs, social identity); (b) social institutions (family, religion, education, work, media); (c) societal processes (socialization, deviance, urbanization); (d) inequalities (gender, income, race-ethnic, region); and (e) the politics, economy, and international position of Japan.

  • SOCIAL STRATIFICATION AND SOCIAL INEQUALITY
    Sociology 351, Credits: 3

    An analysis of the causes, consequences, and remedies of inequalities in power, income, wealth, authority, ethnic and social status.

  • URBAN SOCIETY
    Sociology 352, Credits: 3

    A study to acquaint the student with historical development of urban centers, the increasing societal dominance of urbanism, the aspects of urbanism that constitute societal problems as well as societal contributions and new urban trends such as suburbanism and urban renewal.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION
    Sociology 353, Credits: 3

    A study of the function and forms of religious groups in primitive and contemporary societies as well as theoretical examination of religion as a basic social institution. (Offered jointly with Religious Studies.)

  • SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
    Sociology 355, Credits: 3

    An examination of the process and results of human interaction with an emphasis on attitudes and attitude change, society and personality, inter-group relations and processes of socialization.

  • POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY
    Sociology 356, Credits: 3

    An analysis of the impact of social cleavages and cohesions on the operation of political institutions; the composition and behavior of power elites; the social bases of political power; and the social functions of electoral behavior. (Offered jointly with Political Science.)

  • CONTEMPORARY CHINESE SOCIETY
    Sociology 358, Credits: 3

    This course is an overview of post-Mao Chinese society. It focuses on the institutional, demographic, cultural, economic, and political transformation in China since 1978. Included are changes in rural and urban social life, mass migration, changing family and gender relations, social and economic inequalities, ethnic and regional diversity, and rising social tensions.

  • POPULATION STUDIES
    Sociology 362, Credits: 3

    A study of the development of world population and the social significance of different population sizes and growth rates; emphasis on the social determinants of fertility, mortality and migration.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF LAW
    Sociology 365, Credits: 3

    An introduction to the interdependence of law and society through an analysis of legal concepts and organization from a sociological view.

  • JUVENILE DELINQUENCY
    Sociology 370, Credits: 3

    A study of the incidence of delinquency, theories and findings regarding causation, and the policies designed for treatment and prevention of delinquency.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF VIOLENT CRIME
    Sociology 371, Credits: 3

    This course will provide an in-depth look at homicide and other violent crimes as a social and legal category and at the social psychological variables that affect them. Various types of criminal violence will be examined in American society and in a global context. Forensic issues will be addressed along with political and social issues.

  • WHITE-COLLAR CRIME: CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENTAL DEVIANCE
    Sociology 372, Credits: 3

    This course examines crimes committed by persons of respectability and high social status in the course of their occupation, with a focus on corporate and governmental deviance. Students will learn about historical and comtemporary cases of white-collar crime, sociological explanations of white-collar crime, and the politics of regulatory law and presidential scandals.

  • WHITE-COLLAR CRIME: CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENTAL DEVIANCE - EXAM
    Sociology 372EX, Credits: 3

    WHITE-COLLAR CRIME: CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENTAL DEVIANCE - WAIVER BY EXAM

  • SOCIOLOGY OF TERRORISM
    Sociology 373, Credits: 3

    This course will examine Terrorism as a weapon of power, a forensic issue, and a social phenomenon. Types of Terror, types of groups and governments involved in terrror, and the people who become terrorists will be examined. Theories of political policy, group dynamics, and individual predilections will be evaluated so that terrorism can be understood and combated.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF POLICE AND COURTS
    Sociology 374, Credits: 3

    A sociological analysis of the development and behavior of the police, lawyers, prosecutors and judiciary in society and their role in social control.

  • RESTORATIVE JUSTICE
    Sociology 375, Credits: 3

    This course offers an overview of Restorative Justice including a consideration of definitions, cultural roots, theoretical orgins, key principles, models and practices, global conflicts and peaceful resolutions, controversial issues, and future directions. The course also provides a critical assessment of the potential of Restorative Justice as well as its limitations.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF DRUGS AND CRIME
    Sociology 377, Credits: 3

    This course examines the intersection of drugs and crime in society through the social constructionist perspective. It explores how believed truths and realities about drugs are often socially created, how laws and drug control has been constructed and maintained, how culture and history influence drugs and crime perceptions, and how norms, values and ideas concerning drugs are created and perpetuated.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF PUNISHMENT AND CORRECTIONS
    Sociology 378, Credits: 3

    The critical analysis of probation, parole, halfway houses, jails and prisons. Their origins in and possible function for the larger society will also be examined. Field trip is required.

  • WOMEN AND CRIME
    Sociology 379, Credits: 3

    This course examines the frequency and nature of female offending and female victimization; the frequently blurred boundaries of female victimization and criminalization; and the role of criminal law, police, and courts in the processing of female victims and offenders.

  • ORGANIZATIONS AND SOCIETY
    Sociology 380, Credits: 3

    An examination of the growth and role of organizations in society with specific attention to American society.

  • SOCIOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION
    Sociology 385, Credits: 3

    A survey course designed to critically examine the sociological theories of change. Also examines contemporary empirical developments and their relevance for social policy. Illustrations will be drawn from work done in the developing countries.

  • THE HOLOCAUST: NAZI GERMANY AND THE GENOCIDE OF THE JEWS
    Sociology 388, Credits: 3

    This course will examine the origins, implementation, and legacies of the Nazi Holocaust against the Jews. It is intended to help students gain an appreciation of the importance of the Holocaust to the Jewish experience, while understanding that other groups also were victimized. (Offered jointly with religious studies).

  • RACE AND ETHNICITY IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE (DV)
    Sociology 391, Credits: 3

    An examination of the circumstances under which racial and ethnic groups receive privileged or disadvantaged social locations. Particular consideration is given to theories of racial and ethnic inequality and the processes that form the structures of differential and unequal relations in society. A cross-national comparison of social construction of race and ethnicity will provide additional context of understanding patterns and theories of race and ethnic relations.

  • AFRICAN AMERICAN FAMILIES (DV)
    Sociology 392, Credits: 3

    This course will survey the historical development of the Afro-American Family from Africa to modern times. Significant events (e.g., the slave trade, slavery, and migration) will be scrutinized in order to ascertain their role in shaping the contemporary Black Family life. Other important social and economic forces will be illuminated to assess their impact. The latest body of literature models, paradigms, hypotheses, and statistical findings will be critically examined to enhance understanding of modern day Black Family premarital and marital relations, adaptive patterns, and dislocations. (Offered jointly with Afro-American Studies.)

  • RACIAL & ETHNIC INEQUALITY: BEYOND THE CLASSROOM
    Sociology 393, Credits: 3

    Readings in theoretical, empirical, and policy literature will offer an in-depth study of racial and ethnic inequality in criminal justice, housing, poverty, health, education and immigration. The class features an experiential component through field trips across the region to thematically orientated site visits with experts in the field of inequality.

  • MINORITY AND MULTIRACIAL FAMILIES (DV)
    Sociology 394, Credits: 3

    This course will examine the "traditional" definition of family throughout American history as well as how more and more families challenge this definition. We will discuss how political, economic and social factors have shaped the experiences, structure and dynamics of families; and we will analyze trends in family formation patterns. (Offered jointly with Race and Ethnic Studies).

  • ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY
    Sociology 420, Credits: 3

    This course is a broad survey of anthropological theory. The goal is to understand anthropology's specific historical trajectory as it relates to theory and to see how anthropological theory has been put into practice/informed ethnographic writing, both classic and contemporary monographs. Students will be expected to engage at a high level through critical reading and critical writing assignments. Unreq: SOCIOLGY 473, ANTHROPL 420

  • MINORITIES & THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (DV)
    Sociology 426, Credits: 3

    This course is designed to explore the relationship between minority status and criminal justice processing. Racial, ethnic, and sexual minority groups will be examined in this course. Each student will be expected to develop a general understanding of several minority groups and a thorough understanding of one minority group of his/her choice.

  • CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORY
    Sociology 472, Credits: 3

    This course is an in-depth investigation of criminological theories with an emphasis on sociological criminology. Students will compare-contrast the assumptions, principles and concepts of major theories, examine empirical research relevant to the theories, and consider the policy applications of theoretical perspectives.

  • SOCIAL THEORY: CLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES
    Sociology 473, Credits: 3

    An examination of classical and contemporary social thought. The connections between early major European and contemporary U.S. and international theorists will be emphasized to analyze key areas of sociological inquiry. The course will map important theoretical camps in sociology as well as conduct analysis of contemporary and historical issues using social theory. Unreq: SOCIOLGY 420, ANTHROPL 420

  • METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH
    Sociology 476, Credits: 3

    To acquaint the student with research methods in sociology and the social sciences; the foundation of sociology in science; the role of theory in research; construction of the research design; sampling, data gathering techniques, and analysis and interpretation of data.

  • SUPERVISED TEACHING AIDE
    Sociology 482, Credits: 2

    This course provides selected undergraduates with teaching experience in a college classroom. Students learn from a teaching aide experience in which the student assists an instructor in preparing, delivering, and overseeing lab, review or discussion sessions or by tutoring students. The student will attend the class sessions for a second time, meet weekly with the instructor, and is under the direct supervision of a faculty mentor.

  • WORKSHOP
    Sociology 490, Credits: 1-6

    Variable topics. Group activity oriented presentations emphasizing `hands on` and participatory instructional techniques. Repeatable.

  • TRAVEL STUDY
    Sociology 491, Credits: 1-3

    Variable topics. Faculty-led courses abroad. Repeatable.

  • FIELD STUDY
    Sociology 492, Credits: 1-6

    Variable topics.

  • APPLIED SOCIOLOGY
    Sociology 493, Credits: 1-12

    This course involves a supervised internship in a public or private organization. Through on campus seminars and written assignments on the intern experience, students learn how sociology can be applied to solve social problems. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits in degree. Prereq: Consent of internship coordinator.

  • SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY
    Sociology 494, Credits: 3

    Variable topics. Group activity. An advanced course of study in a defined subject matter area emphasizing a small group in intense study with a faculty member. Repeatable.

  • SPECIAL STUDIES
    Sociology 496, Credits: 1-3

    Variable topics. Group activity. Not offered regularly in the curriculum but offered on topics selected on the basis of timeliness, need, and interest, and generally in the format of regularly scheduled Catalog offerings. Repeatable.

  • EXCHANGE STUDY
    Sociology 497, Credits: 1-12

    Variable topics.

  • INDEPENDENT STUDY
    Sociology 498, Credits: 1-3

    Repeatable, in combination with SOCIOLGY 498R, for a maximum of 6 units in major or minor, and 12 units in degree. Cannot substitute for SOCIOLGY 476 or SOCIOLGY 473 or SOCIOLGY 472. Cannot use S/NC grading.

  • INDEPENDENT STUDY- UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
    Sociology 498R, Credits: 1-3

    Study of a selected topic or topics under the direction of a faculty member. Repeatable.

  • SENIOR HONORS THESIS
    Sociology 499, Credits: 2

    The senior honors thesis is a unique requirement of the Honors Emphasis major which is designed to recognize a student's exceptional dedication and ability. Student will complete a substantial research project in their senior year. Results must be written up as a thesis, presented in a seminar, and defended orally.

Location

College of Letters & Sciences
Laurentide Hall 4100
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
800 W. Main Street
Whitewater, WI 53190-1790

Resources For

Faculty/Staff Contact

Office of the Dean
Rebecca Reichert
Phone: (262) 472-1621
E-mail: reicherr@uww.edu

Student Contact

Advising Office
Phone: (262) 472-1550
E-mail: lsadvise@uww.edu

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