Resources for:

    Philosophy

    Philosophy & Religious Studies

    Department Resources


    Contact Information


    David Cartwright
    Department Chair-Professor
    Phone: (262) 472-5268
    Location: Laurentide 4207

    Course Descriptions

    Philosophy Courses

    TRUTH AND THE MEDIA

    Philosophy 121, Credits: 3

    There is a vast array of media outlets, political talking heads, and mass-marketed paraphernalia that claim to know what you should know, how you should feel about it, and what the best things are for you. We live thoroughly media-ted. This course critiques our current media culture on the veracity/rationality of their epistemic claims.

    INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

    Philosophy 241, Credits: 3

    An introduction to philosophical thought. Representative philosophers and representative issues, such as the nature of ethical reasoning, rival theories of knowledge, and the individual's relation to society, are considered. The emphasis is on argument and analysis, and on issues which are relevant to philosophical problems.

    CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES

    Philosophy 245, Credits: 3

    An analysis and critical examination of contemporary moral issues related to business, science, and social policy as developed by current participants in the debate and moral philosophers of various periods and philosophical perspectives.

    BIOETHICS

    Philosophy 247, Credits: 3

    This course introduces key ethical approaches as Kantian ethics, utilitarianism, and feminist ethics and addresses their application to issues in health care practice. Ethical issues to be addressed may include: end-of-life decisions, family planning, genetic technology, access to health care, and the role of health care professionals.

    ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS

    Philosophy 248, Credits: 3

    A critical examination of ethical issues and problems arising from human interaction with non-human animals and the natural environment. Topics, such as the moral status of non-human animals, the moral bases of an environmental ethics, biodiversity, and sustainable development, will be considered by examining the writing of philosophers representing various perspectives.

    LOGIC

    Philosophy 251, Credits: 3

    By examining basic concepts, methods, and techniques for evaluating argumentation, this course aims at developing students' abilities to recognize, criticize, and construct arguments. The relationship between language and good reasoning will also be considered.

    INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS

    Philosophy 261, Credits: 3

    A study of the main Western theories of moral value and obligation. These theories will be analyzed in terms of their adequacy for solving moral problems and their ability to articulate the morally good life. Consideration will also be given to challenges to normative ethics.

    INTRODUCTION TO AESTHETICS

    Philosophy 271, Credits: 3

    An analysis and discussion of problems as to the nature of art, artistic truth or insight, aesthetic appreciation, evaluation of works of art, creativity, and the role of the artist in society.

    SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY

    Philosophy 281, Credits: 3

    A discussion of ideas which are basic to thinking about society, its purposes, and its structure. Such ideas as justice, equality, rights, obligations and freedom are examined.

    PHILOSOPHY OF THE NATURAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

    Philosophy 291, Credits: 3

    A critical examination of the methods, presuppositions, and concepts of the natural and social sciences. This course examines key concepts in the sciences such as time, space, explanation, verification, model construction, etc.

    KNOWLEDGE AND REALITY

    Philosophy 310, Credits: 3

    This course examines key philosophical positions and figures regarding knowledge (epistemology) and reality (metaphysics). We will ask questions such as: What do we know? How do we know? What is reality? Why is there a world? What is space? What is time? and What is social ontology?

    CLASSICAL PHILOSOPHY

    Philosophy 341, Credits: 3

    An introduction to the major figures in Greek philosophy, including representative pre-Socratic philosophers, Plato, and Aristotle, focusing on Classical sources of philosophy of science, ethics, political philosophy, and theory of knowledge.

    MODERN PHILOSOPHY

    Philosophy 342, Credits: 3

    This course concentrates on the main movements in philosophy from Descartes through Kant. Principal works and selections from the major philosophers will be read.

    19TH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY

    Philosophy 346, Credits: 3

    This course concentrates on the main movements in 19th century philosophy. Selections from principal works of major philosophers of the period, such as Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Marx, Husserl, Peirce, and James, will be critically examined.

    20TH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY

    Philosophy 347, Credits: 3

    This course concentrates on the main movements in 2oth century philosophy. Selections from principal works of major philosophers of the period, such as Ayer, Wittgenstein, Quine, Carnap, Heidegger, Sartre, Irigary, Lyotard, and Derrida will be critically examined.

    EXISTENTIALISM

    Philosophy 364, Credits: 3

    Existentialism is the philosophy of the individual - existing, concrete individual, As a reaction against totalitizing systems that leave individuals as small cogs in the wheel of history. Existentialists tackle questions about what it means to be an individual and the struggle of living in freedom - and so shall we.

    PHILOSOPHY OF GENDER AND RACE

    Philosophy 381, Credits: 3

    This course examines the philosophical assumptions underlying concepts of gender and race. Topics include: historical and contemporary arguments about race and gender as biological categories; the relationship between the use of these categories and the persistence of sexism and racism; and race and gender in theories of subjectivity.

    FEMINIST PHILOSOPHY

    Philosophy 390, Credits: 3

    An introduction to feminist philosophy including its relation to other philosophical traditions, its historical development, and its relevance to concerns in areas such as ethics, theory of knowledge, political philosophy, and philosophy of religion.

    WORKSHOP

    Philosophy 490, Credits: 1-3

    Variable topics. Group activity oriented presentations emphasizing `hands on` and participatory instructional techniques. Repeatable

    SEMINAR

    Philosophy 494, Credits: 1-3

    Variable topics.Group activity. An advanced course of study in a defined subject matter area emphasizing a small group in intense study with a faculty member. Repeatable

    SPECIAL STUDIES

    Philosophy 496, Credits: 1-3

    Variable topics. Group activity. Not offered regularly in the curriculum but offered on topics selected on the basis of timeliness, need, and interest, and generally in the format of regularly scheduled Catalog offerings. Repeatable

    INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Philosophy 498, Credits: 1-3

    Study of a selected topic or topics under the direction of a faculty member. Repeatable

    Location

    College of Letters & Sciences
    Laurentide Hall 4100
    University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
    800 W. Main Street
    Whitewater, WI 53190-1790

    Contact

    Office of the Dean
    Phone: (262) 472-1621
    E-mail: lamkinn@uww.edu

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