Lesson Preparation and Analysis Forms

University Student's Name: 
Date: 
Setting: 
IFSP Objectives:
 Be specific. Take the objectives directly from the IFSP. Each lesson/home visit should address several objectives. If none of the children have disabilities, or there is no IFSP, base your objectives on what you know are developmentally appropriate activities for this child or group of children.

Rationale for Lesson: Why are the activities you have designed important for this child? How will they help this child?

Materials/Equipment Needed: If you are planning for home visits, use materials available in the home whenever possible. Be creative. Remember that pots and pans can be just as interesting to children as the most expensive toy. If you are describing a home visit, include ALL of the materials for the ENTIRE visit.

Co-Teaching/Collaboration with Family Members: Don't forget siblings and pets!

Individual Matrix: Use the format below to plan the lesson and to demonstrate how your activity can be embedded into the family or childcare center routine. The labels for the developmental areas and routines are suggestions. You could put the specific IFSP goals across the top. You should insert the labels that are more appropriate for the child and the setting (i.e. home or childcare). The routines and activities should also be individualized to the child/family and setting. Put your 
instructional strategies in the cells. What will you or the caregivers do to help the child reach the goal in the context of this activity?

Routine/Activity Health IFSP Goal Cognitive/General Development IFSP Goal Language and Communication IFSP Goal Social/Emotional IFSP Goal Gross Motor IFSP Goal Fine Motor IFSP Goal
             
             

Results of Instruction: What child outcomes were achieved? Any unanticipated outcomes? Link your outcomes to the IFSP goals.

As you engage the child in the activity note:

  • How was the child engaged in the activity?
  • Which instructional activities were most successful? Why?
  • Which instructional strategies were unsuccessful? Why?
  • What adjustments would improve this lesson? Why?

Things to Leave with the Childcare Teacher/Provide (if the child receives services in the center): What information from this experience did you share with the child's care provider? How did you share the information? For example, you might have a routines-based version of the lesson you planned and possibly activities and materials you used in the child's care setting that the provider(s) can use during the week. Provide a rationale for why you chose to share these particular activity/materials in the way you planned.

Things to Leave with the Family: What information from this experience did you share with the child's family? How did you share the information? For example, you might have a family-friendly version of the lesson you planned and possibly activities and materials you used in the family's home that they can use during the week. Provide a rationale for why you chose to share these particular activity/materials in the way you did.

Lesson Plan for Infants/Toddlers in Group Care Settings

University Student's Name: 
Date: 
Setting: 
Teaching Goals:
 Be specific. Individualized goals should relate directly to each child's current level of functioning based upon current formal or informal assessments completed. Each child in the group should have a goal for each planned activity or experience (linked to the Wisconsin Model Early Learning Standards and/or IFSP). Goals should be developmentally and culturally/linguistically appropriate for each child, as well as meaningful and of interest to the child. Goals for children may be the same, if developmentally appropriate.

Rationale for each Activity/Experience: Why are the activities you have designed important to this group of children? How will this activity meet children's goals and help children create new understanding?

Materials/Equipment Needed for each Activity or Experience: Consider special materials you may need in order to implement the activity or experience you have planned.

Environmental Modifications: Record any environmental modifications made to help children achieve your goals this week. Consider what materials you might add to the block area, to dramatic play, to the sensory table or to any other interest area to encourage other experiential learning that may help children achieve your established goals for the week.

Planning Matrix: Use the format below to plan the lesson and to demonstrate how your activity or experience will be individualized to each child in your group participating in the lesson. Place the individualized goal for each child in the corresponding cell, as well as the strategy you will use to meet that child's goal through the activity or experience you have planned. You should be planning for at least 2-3 activities or experiences daily during your 2 lead weeks; each having individualized goals and strategies for each child in your group (you may need to add columns to chart to accommodate the group size each day).

Activity or Experience Child A Child B Child C Child D
EXAMPLE-
Diapering
Developmental Goal:
Listen and respond while I use descriptive wordsStrategy: I will point to her belly and say, "belly" and point to her knee and say "knee".
Developmental Goal: 
Listen and begin to understand descriptive words (big, little, etc).Strategy: I will point out her body parts and describe them (big belly, little feet, etc).
Developmental Goal:
To identify body parts by nodding "yes" or "no".Strategy: I will point to her eyes and ask, "are these your eyes?" I will then touch her feet and say, "Is this your belly?"
Developmental Goal: 
The child will point to her body parts using non-verbal and verbal communication (e.g. indicating yes, no).Strategy: I will ask, "where is your nose?" "Is this your ear?" etc.
  Developmental Goal:Strategy: Developmental Goal:Strategy: Developmental Goal:Strategy: Developmental Goal:Strategy:

Lesson/Routine Script: How will you introduce the activity?

As you engage children in the activities note:

  • What did you do/say during the lesson/routine?
  • What curriculum modifications (CM), embedded learning opportunities (ELO), and child-focused instructional strategies (CFIS) were incorporated to help children more fully engage in the lesson/routine?
  • How did you transition out of the activity?

Results of Instruction: What child outcomes were achieved? Were there any unanticipated outcomes? Link your outcomes to the IFSP goals and/or the WMELS.

As you engage the child in the activity note:

  • How were the children engaged in the activity?
  • Which instructional activities were most successful? Why?
  • Which instructional strategies were unsuccessful? Why?
  • What adjustments would improve this lesson? Why?

Things to Provide for Family members: What information from this experience did you share with family members? How did you share the information? For example, you might have a family-friendly version of the lesson you planned and possibly activities and materials that family members can use during the week. Provide a rationale for why you chose to share these particular activity/materials in the way you did.

Lesson Preparation and Analysis Form (children over three years old)

University Student's Name: 
Date: 
Group and Age Range of Children:
Setting: 
Title of activity/lesson/project and brief description:

Pre-instruction

  • Expected overall outcomes (the big ideas I want children to explore, big questions I want them to answer, or experiences I want them to have)
  • Learning objectives (active and measurable objectives for whole group and individual children as needed, remember Bloom's taxonomy and higher order thinking)
    Individualized Education Goals (IEPs) addressed (as applicable)
    Link to WMELS or academic standards
  • Rationale for choosing the activity (why I chose this particular activity)
  • Measurement of child outcomes (how I will check for individual success in child(ren) demonstrating learned outcomes)
  • Adaptations to individual student needs (curriculum modifications (CM), embedded learning opportunities (ELO), and child-focused instructional strategies (CFIS) helping an individual child or all children engage and participate in this activity/lesson)
  • Environmental preparations (how I prepare the physical environment so children feel invited to engage in learning opportunities)
  • Materials (items I and the children need to complete the activity; do I have all materials on-hand to avoid wait time?)

Instruction

Description of activity (implementing instructional strategies - script of what I plan to do):

  • Transition into the activity
  • Introduction (how will I engage children in a meaningful way?)
  • Activity (prompts and questions I will use to engage children)
  • Closing and transition to next activity

Results of Instruction

  • Problems that might be encountered (and what I will do if this occurs)
  • Problems that actually arose and how I responded
  • Behavior management techniques used during activity
  • Evaluation of how well the activity/lesson met the expected group and individual students' learning outcomes (show evidence of measurement/assessment)
  • What I learned from this activity

Adapted from: Rosenberg, O'Shea, & O'Shea (1991)