College of Education & Professional Studies

Undergraduate Programs

Bachelor of Science in Education: Health, Physical Education, Adapted P.E. (HPEA)

The Physical Education major provides opportunities supporting both licensure to teach in the public schools, and preparation for careers outside the public schools in health, physical education, recreation and coaching. There are two physical education major programs: (1) a 54-unit major and includes course work leading to a broadfield (K-12) public school licensure, (2) a 35-unit major, requiring an approved minor, leading to careers outside the public schools in the areas of health promotion, human performance and recreation.

 

The Health, Human Performance and Recreation (HHPR) emphasis integrates these disciplines to include dimensions from health promotion, health education, exercise science, physical education, recreation, leisure studies, coaching education and sport. With this emphasis students must select a minor and may choose from a variety of minors both within and outside the Department. Students often choose Health Promotion, Recreation and Leisure Studies or Athletic Coaching Education as a minor to match their career interests. Students will need to consult with an advisor concerning minors outside the Department.

Degree Requirements (10-16 credits)

Requirement V.1: Measurement, Evaluation and Research Requirement

Choose one:

Note: If HEALTHED 471 is used to satisfy this requirement, the same course may not also be used to satisfy a requirement in the Health Promotion minor. The Advising Report will show the course as satisfying both requirements, which is an error that must be monitored by advisors and students.

Requirement V.2: Pre-Internship Requirement

PEPROF 209: Investigating Community Professions in Physical Education 

should be completed three semesters prior to enrolling in PEPROF 493 Health, Human Performance and Recreation Internship.

Requirement V.3: Internship (6-12 credits)

Select 6-12 credits from PEPROF 493: Health, Human Performance and Recreation Internship.

Internship proposals complete with resume, goals and objectives, and a signed site agreement are due on March 14 for the Fall Semester; October 14 for the Spring Semester; and March 1 for the Summer Session. No exceptions to these deadlines are possible. Complete information is provided on the Internships page.

Major Requirements (35 credits)

Requirement VII.1: Core Requirements

Students are strongly encouraged to enroll concurrently (i.e., at the same time) in both PEPROF 415 and PEPROF 416.Note: RECREATN 320 is required for students admitted to Health, Human Performance and Recreation after the Spring Semester of 2012. Other students may use RECREATN 320 as a programming course to satisfy requirement VII.3 or as an elective to satisfy requirement VII.6.

Requirement VII.2: Health and Safety Requirement

Select 3 credits:

Requirement VII.3: Programming Requirement

Select 3 credits:

Note: RECREATN 320 is required to satisfy the Core Requirements for students admitted to Health, Human Performance and Recreation after the Spring Semester of 2012. Other students may use RECREATN 320 to satisfy requirement VII.3 which will be personalized on the Advising Report.

Requirement VII.4: Administration Requirement

Select 3 credits:

Requirement VII.5: Special Populations Requirement

Select 3 credits:

Requirement VII.6: Electives in the Major

Select two or five credits in Health, Physical Education, Recreation or Coaching approved by your advisor. May usually be any course in Health, Physical Education, Recreation or Coaching with prefixes HEALTHEDPEPROFRECREATN and/or COACHING, not otherwise used in a major or minor, but excluding courses in General Studies Physical Education with prefix PEGNRL. Students admitted to Health, Human Performance and Recreation after the Spring Semester of 2012 are required to complete two units of electives. Other students are required to complete five units of electives.

Proficiency Requirements

First Aid, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Automatic External Defibrillation Requirements

The First Aid, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Automatic External Defibrillation requirements may be satisfied through completion of PEPROF 281: First Aid and C.P.R. or through completion of one or more short-duration, face-to-face courses available from recognized agencies such as the American Heart Association and American Red Cross.

Writing Proficiency Requirement

The Writing Proficiency Requirement may be completed by some students as part of PEPROF 165: Introduction to Physical Education and Mechanical Principles or by completion of the Department Writing Proficiency Examination which is offered at scheduled times every semester.

For more information about the Health, Human Performance and Recreation Emphasis, contact:

Andrea Ednie, PhD
Program Director for Health, Human Performance and Recreation 
126 Williams Center
Office Phone: (262) 472-1351
E-mail: edniea@uww.edu


The Physical Education - Licensure emphasis leads to a 530 Physical Education Professional Educator license from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. This licensure provides students with the flexibility to teach students at all levels in both elementary and/or secondary schools. Students who are interested in making themselves highly marketable may choose from two additional add-on Professional Educator licenses: 910 Health Professional Educator and 860 Adaptive Physical Education.
Major Four-Year Plan
Physical Education EC-A Emphasis (BSE) - Program Sheet 

VI. PI-34 Licensure Section

  1. EFOUND 212: Education Psychology (3 credits)
  2. EDFOUND 243: Pluralistic Society (3 credits)
  3. EDFOUNDPRC 210: Introduction to Teaching (3 credits)
  4. PEPROF 466: Literacy Strategies (3 credits )
  5. PEPROF 492: Field Study-Elementary (1 credits)
  6. PEPROF 492: Field Study-Secondary (1 credits)
  7. PEFIELD 411: Direct Teaching-Elementary (6 credits)
  8. PEFIELD 414: Direct Teaching-Secondary (6 credits)
  9. PEPROF 401: Teacher Performance Assessment (1 credits)
  10. PEPROF 410: Student Teaching Seminar (2 credits)

VII. Major - 54 Credits

PETE Foundations  9 Credits

  1. PEPROF 166: Introduction to Physical Education Teaching Profession (3 credits)
  2. PEPROF 240: Standards-based Curriculum and Planning (3 credits)
  3. PEPROF 260: Assessment in Physical Education (3 credits)

Sciences  13 Credits

  1. PEPROF 250: Motor Development and Learning (3 credits)
  2. PEPROF 271: Structure and Function (4 credits)
  3. PEPROF 371: Kinesiology (3 credits)
  4. PEPROF 471: Physiology of Exercise (3 credits) 

Teaching  23 Credits

  1. PEPROF 173: Teaching Tumbling and Gymnastics (3 credits) 
  2. PEPROF 230: Teaching Aquatics (2 credits) 
  3. PEPROF 345: Teaching Cooperative/ Adventure Education (3 credits) 
  4. PEPROF 355: Teaching Invasion Games (3 credits)
  5. PEPROF 365: Teaching Fitness for Physical Education (3 credits)
  6. PEPROF 407: Teaching Rhythms and Dance (3 credits)
  7. PEPROF 417: Teaching Net/Wall Games (3 credits)
  8. PEPROF 427: Teaching Target Games (3 credits)

Methods  9 Credits

  1. PEPROF 437: Methods of Teaching Physical Education-Elementary (3 credits)
  2. PEPROF 447: Methods of Teaching Physical Educatio-Secondary (3 credits)
  3. PEPROF 475: Adapted Physical Education for Licensure Studies (3 credits) 

Proficiencies:

Intermediate Swim Certification (American Red Cross-lvl6 or Swim Proficiency test)American Red Cross CPR, Defibrillator, First Aid (PEPROF 281 or off-campus w/cards)University Writing Requirement (PEPROF 166)Human Relations Requirement (PEPROF 240)

More Information

For more information about the Physical Education - Licensure Emphasis, contact:
Jay Cameron
Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Coaching
Williams Center 138
Office Phone:  (262) 472-1649
E-mail: cameronj@uww.edu


I. Required Core Courses (14 credits)
COACHING 250 Application of Mechanical Principles to Coaching 

* Note: PEPROF 371 may substitute as a course equivalent for HHPR majorsCOACHING 255 Conditioning of Interscholastic Sport 

* Note: Pre-requisite is COACHING 250 or PEPROF 371COACHING 256 Psychosocial Aspects of Coaching 

COACHING 341 Advanced Topics in Strength and Conditioning 

* Note: Pre-requisite is COACHING 255

COACHING 342 Principles of Olympic Weightlifting

RECREATN 450 Planning Design and Management of Facilities in Sport and Rec

III. Required Field Experience (2-3 credits)

COACHING 492 Field Study in Athletic Coaching

IV. Electives (5-6 credits)

HEALTHED 391 Nutrition for Health

COACHING 461 Prevention and Care of Injuries

COACHING 498 Independent Study

COACHING/RECREATN 480 Legal Aspects of Sport and Recreation

COACHING 440 Commercial and Entrepreneurial Recreation

For non HHPR majors

PEPROF 271 Structure and Function * Note: See pre-requisite/s in course catalog

PEPROF 371Kinesiology * Note: See pre-requisite/s in course catalog

PEPROF 471 Physiology of Exercise * Note: See pre-requisite/s in course catalog

PEPROF 281 First Aid and CPR

Total=22 Credits

The Field Study is a practical learning experience for students in Strength and Conditioning. This experience allows students the opportunity to practice the application of theory and apply the knowledge acquired through academic preparation, while learning skills of an entry level practitioner. Experience at a Field Study site not only draws on course offerings, but makes possible the development of professional skills. The Field Study is an in-depth supervised work and study experience, where the student has a degree of responsibility for planning, directing and supervising the work of others. 

For more information about the Strength and Conditioning  Minor, contact:

Dr. Kelly Witte
Associate Professor, HPERC
126-W Williams Center
Office Phone: (262) 472-5650
E-mail: wittek@uww.edu


I. Introduction Course: (2 credits)

RECREATN 233 Introduction to Sport Management 2 Credits

II. Additional Required Minor Courses: (12 credits)

RECREATN 388 Special Event Management 3 Credits

RECREATN/COACHING 480 Legal Aspects of Sport and Recreation Activity 3 Credits

RECREATN 450 Planning Design and Management of Facilities in Sport and Rec 3 Credits

RECREATN 440 Commercial and Entrepreneurial Recreation 3 Credits

III. Field Experience (3 Credits)

RECREATN 492 Recreation Field Study 3 Credits

IV. Electives (Select 5 Credits)

RECREATN 489 Managing Recreational Sport Programs 3 Credits

RECREATN 491 Globalization of Sport and Recreation 3 Credits

RECREATN 382 Sport and Adventure Tourism 3 Credits

COACHING 460 Organization and Administration of Interscholastic Athletics 2 Credits

RECREATN 498 Independent Study 2-3Credits
Total=22 Credits                                                                                                                                                                 

The Field Study is a practical learning experience for students in Sport Management. This experience allows students the opportunity to practice the application of theory and apply the knowledge acquired through academic preparation, while learning skills of an entry level practitioner. Experience at a Field Study site not only draws on course offerings, but makes possible the development of professional skills. The Field Study is an in-depth supervised work and study experience, where the student has a degree of responsibility for planning, directing and supervising the work of others. 

For more information about the Sport Management Minor, contact:

Dr. Andrea Ednie
Assistant Professo
126-M Williams Center
Office Phone: (262) 472-1351
E-mail: edniea@uww.edu 


The Health Promotion minor provides opportunities to explore knowledge, attitudes and experiences in differing health fields. A holistic approach is used to determine the impact that health promotion, health education, health maintenance, and wellness have on various lay and professional populations.

Note: Courses selected for this minor, CANNOT be used in a major. Minor DOES NOT lead to licensure in Health Education.

Elective Courses in Physical Education and Health Education: Select 6 or more credits:

Physical Education Courses:

Health Education Courses:

General Courses: Select 0 or more credits:

Psychology Course:

Safety Courses:

Social Work Courses:

Sociology Courses:

Communication Courses: 

The Health Promotion minor provides opportunitites to explore knowledge, attitudes, and experiences in differing health fields. A holistic approach is used to determine the impact that health promotion, health education, health maintenance, and wellness have on various lay and professional populations.

 For more information about the Health Promotion Minor, contact:

Dr. Brandi Niemeier
Assistant Professor, HPERC
115 Williams Center
Office Phone: (262) 472-1442
E-mail:niemeieb@uww.edu


The Health Education minor provides opportunities to explore knowledge, attitudes and experiences in differing health fields. A holistic approach is used to determine the impact that health promotion, health education, health maintenance, and wellness have on various lay and professional populations. The Health Education minor allows students to pursue an add-on 910 Health Professional Educator license from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.

Required Classes for Minor

Select 3 Electives from the Following

Other Resources

For more information about the Health Education Minor, contact:

Professor Logan Edwards

124 Williams Center

Office Phone: (262) 472-1374

E-mail: edwardsl@uww.edu


The Recreation and Leisure Studies (RLS) minor prepares recreation professionals who work to meet people's needs during their leisure time. Recreation professionals must be sensitive to the needs of people and have the ability to work with diverse types of people. They may work to organize or teach activities; hire, train, supervise and schedule staff; operate indoor and/or outdoor facilities, including parks, pools, trails and gymnasiums; and manage equipment, funds and/or other leisure resources.

Required Core Courses (5-8 credits)

Requirement 2

Select 3 credits:

Requirement 3

Select 2-8 credits of electives approved by Recreation Coordinator. You should confer with the Recreation Coordinator before enrolling in possible electives outside the Recreation and Leisure Studies program.

Requirement 4

Select 6-12 credits from RECREATN 492: Field Study: Recreation.

The Field Study is a culminating learning experience for students in Recreation and Leisure Studies. This experience allows students the opportunity to practice the application of theory and apply the knowledge acquired through academic preparation, while learning skills of an entry level practitioner. Experience at a Field Study site offering recreation and leisure services not only draws on course offerings, but makes possible the development of professional skills. The Field Study is an in-depth supervised work and study experience, preferably at the supervisor or mid-management level, where the student has a degree of responsibility for planning, directing and supervising the work of others. Contact the Program Coordinator of the Recreation and Leisure Studies Minor (see More Information heading below) two semesters prior to the anticipated Field Study.

Letters & Sciences

Requirement 1

Requirement 2

Select 3 credits:

Requirement 3

Select 2-8 credits of electives approved by Recreation Coordinator. You should confer with the Recreation Coordinator before enrolling in possible electives outside the Recreation and Leisure Studies program.

Requirement 4

Select 6-12 credits from RECREATN 492: Field Study: Recreation.

The Field Study is a culminating learning experience for students in Recreation and Leisure Studies. This experience allows students the opportunity to practice the application of theory and apply the knowledge acquired through academic preparation, while learning skills of an entry level practitioner. Experience at a Field Study site offering recreation and leisure services not only draws on course offerings, but makes possible the development of professional skills. The Field Study is an in-depth supervised work and study experience, preferably at the supervisor or mid-management level, where the student has a degree of responsibility for planning, directing and supervising the work of others. Contact the Program Coordinator of the Recreation and Leisure Studies Minor (see More Information heading below) two semesters prior to the anticipated Field Study.

For more information about the Recreation and Leisure Studies Minor, contact:

Dr. Andrea Ednie, PhD

Assistant Professor

126-M Williams Center

Office Phone: (262) 472-1351

Email: edniea@uww.edu


The Athletic Coaching Education minor is designed to meet the national coaching standards developed by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education. The Athletic Coaching Education minor allows students to pursue an add-on 540 Coaching Athletics Professional Educator license from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.

Unique Requirement

Choose one:

Requirement 1

Requirement 2

COACHING 250 is not required for Health, Human Performance and Recreation majors or Physical Education - Licensure majors. The course may be waived as a prerequisite for other courses by contacting the Coordinator of the Athletic Coaching Education Minor (see More Information heading below).

Requirement 3

Requirement 4

Select 2-3 credits from COACHING 492: Field Study in Coaching. COACHING 492 provides undergraduate students with a supervised capstone experience in coaching. Students will be placed with Department approved university, public, private or community teams or programs to obtain practical experience in the sport(s) of their choice. The site selection should be consistent with the professional objectives selected by the student. Department approval is required following completion and submission of the Coaching Field Study Site Agreement Form which can be obtained from the Department Office. Additional information is available from the Program Coordinator of the Athletic Coaching Education Minor, Dr. Kelly S. Witte (see More Information heading below).

Requirement 5

Select 2-4 credits:

Requirement 6

Select 3-6 credits:

Note: there is a limit of 3 credits that may be taken for COACHING 490, 496 and 498.

Coaching Employment Portfolio and Coaching Exit Interview

Upon completion of all other requirements for the Athletic Coaching Education minor, students must complete a Coaching Employment Portfolio and participate in a Coaching Exit Interview with Coach Matt Zwaschka (Williams Center 202A, (262) 472-1867, zwaschkm@uww.edu).

Other Resources

More Information

For more information about the Athletic Coaching Education Minor, contact:
Dr. Kelly S. Witte
Department Chair and Associate Professor
123A Williams Center
Office Phone: (262) 472-5650
E-mail: wittek@uww.edu


Physical Education Certificate

This certificate serves as the existing structure for students wishing to acquire the Health Education add-on licensure. A health minor is NOT declared for this program. This program does not show up on an AR, however, a student who successfully completes the program will receive a Health Education Certificate from the Department of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Coaching. This certificate program will be identified on a student's transcripts and will then qualify the student for recommendation to the Wisconsin Department of Instruction for licensure in health education.

HEALTH EDUCATION CERTIFICATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

  1. HEALTHED 250: Introduction to Helath Education (3 credits)
  2. HEALTHED 344: Pre K-12 Sex Education (3 credits)
  3. HEALTHED 360: Current Topics in Health & Wellness (3 credits) 
  4. HEALTHED 391: Nutrition OR SAFETY 255 (3 credits) 
  5. HEALTHED 445: Teaching Health Education (3 credits) 
  6. HEALTHED 492: Field Study Health (3 credits) 

Other Resources

For more information about the Health Education Minor, contact:

HPERC Department
123 Williams Center
Office Phone: (262) 472-1140
hperc@uww.edu


 Adapted Physical Education Program Sheet

I. Requirements - 12 Credits

  1. SPECED 205: Introduction to Special Education (3 credits) 
  2. PEPROF 475/675: Adapted Physical Education (3 credits)
  3.  PEPROF 477: Activities of Inclusion from A-Z in Physical Education and Recreation (3 credits)
  4. PEPROF 492: Field Study - Adapted Physical Education (3 credits) 

II. Electives - 15 Credits

  1. SPECED 325/525: Characteristics of CD/EBD/LD (3 credits)
  2. SPECED 360/560: Behavior Management for the Inclusive Classrooms (3 credits) 
  3. SPECED 376/576: Medical Aspects of Disability (3 credits)
  4. SPECED 450/650: Intervention for Children with EBD (3 credits)
  5. SPECED 466/666: Working with Parents of Exceptional Children and Community Agencies (3 credits)

For More Information about this program, contact:

Kathleen Happel

Adapted Physical Education Coordinator

122 Williams Center

Office Phone: (262) 472-1390

Office Fax: (262) 472-3221

E-mail: happelk@uww.edu


Do you have a coaching position available?

Contact Dr. Kelly Witte, Athletic Coaching Education Minor Coordinator, at wittek@uww.edu and she will email all coaching minors announcing the position.

Please provide the following information:

  1. Title of position
  2. Qualifications needed for position
  3. Starting and ending date
  4. Salary
  5. Contact person
  6. Closing date
  7. Other information pertinent to the position

Are you interested in having a coaching field study student?

Contact Dr. Kelly Witte, Athletic Coaching Education Minor Coordinator, at wittek@uww.edu and she will email all coaching minors announcing the position.

Please provide the following information:

  1. Position/Sport
  2. Qualifications needed
  3. Starting and ending date
  4. Contact person
  5. Other information pertinent to the position

To receive a license to coach in Wisconsin, an applicant shall complete an approved program and demonstrate proficient performance in the knowledge, skills and dispositions under all of the following standards:

  1. Coaches know the subjects they are coaching.
    The coach understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines she or he coaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for athletes.
  2. Coaches know how children grow.
    The coach understands how children with broad ranges of ability learn and provides instruction that supports their intellectual, social, and personal development.
  3. Coaches understand that children learn differently.
    The coach understands how athletes differ in their approaches to learning and the barriers that impede learning and can adapt instruction to meet the diverse needs of athletes, including those with disabilities and exceptionalities.
  4. Coaches know how to teach. 
    The coach understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies, including the use of technology, to encourage children's development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.
  5. Coaches know how to manage an athletic environment.
    The coach uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
  6. Coaches communicate well.
    The coach uses effective verbal and nonverbal communication techniques as well as instructional media and technology to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the athletic environment.
  7. Coaches are able to plan different kinds of practices.
    The coach organizes and plans systematic instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, athletes, the community, and athletic goals.
  8. Coaches know how to test for athlete progress.
    The coach understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the athlete.
  9. Coaches are able to evaluate themselves.
    The coach is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his or her choices and actions on athletes, parents, professionals in the learning community and others and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
  10. Coaches are connected with other coaches and the community.
    The coach fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to support athlete learning and well-being and acts with integrity, fairness and in an ethical manner.

© State of Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction


National Standards for Sport Coaches, Second Edition National Association of Sport & Physical Education, 2005

Domain 1 - Philosophy and Ethics

  • Standard 1 - Develop and implement an athlete-centered coaching philosophy.
  • Standard 2 - Identify, model, and teach positive values learned through sport participation.
  • Standard 3 - Teach and reinforce responsible personal, social, and ethical behavior of all people involved in the sport program.
  • Standard 4 - Demonstrate ethical conduct in all facets of the sport program.

Domain 2 - Safety and Injury Prevention

  • Standard 5 - Prevent injuries by providing safe facility.
  • Standard 6 - Ensure that all necessary protective equipment is available, properly fitted, and used appropriately.
  • Standard 7 - Monitor environmental conditions and modify participation as needed to ensure the health and safety of participants.
  • Standard 8 - Identify physical conditions that predispose athletes to injuries.
  • Standard 9 - Recognize injuries and provide immediate and appropriate care.
  • Standard 10 - Facilitate a coordinated sports health care program of prevention, care, and management of injuries.
  • Standard 11 - Identify and address the psychological implications of injury.

Domain 3 - Physical Conditioning

  • Standard 12 - Design programs of training, conditioning, and recovery that properly utilize exercise physiology and biomechanical principles.
  • Standard 13 - Teach and encourage proper nutrition for optimal physical and mental performance and overall good health.
  • Standard 14 - Be an advocate for drug-free sport participation and provide accurate information about drugs and supplements.
  • Standard 15 - Plan conditioning programs to help athletes return to full participation following injury.

Domain 4 - Growth and Development

  • Standard 16 - Apply knowledge of how developmental change influences the learning and performance of sport skills.
  • Standard 17 - Facilitate the social and emotional growth of athletes by supporting a positive sport experience and lifelong participation in physical activity.
  • Standard 18 - Provide athletes with responsibility and leadership opportunities as they mature.

Domain 5 - Teaching and Communication

  • Standard 19 - Provide a positive learning environment that is appropriate to the characteristics of the athletes and goals of the program.
  • Standard 20 - Develop and monitor goals for the athletes and program.
  • Standard 21 - Organize practice based on a seasonal or annual practice plan to maintain motivation, manage fatigue, and allow for peak performance at the appropriate time.
  • Standard 22 - Plan and implement daily practice activities that maximize time on task and available resources.
  • Standard 23 - Utilize appropriate instructional strategies to facilitate athlete development and performance.
  • Standard 24 - Teach and incorporate mental skills to enhance performance and reduce sport anxiety.
  • Standard 25 - Use effective communication skills to enhance individual learning, group success, and enjoyment in the sport experience.
  • Standard 26 - Demonstrate and utilize appropriate and effective motivational techniques to enhance athlete performance and satisfaction.

Domain 6 - Sport Skills and Tactics

  • Standard 27 - Know the skills, elements of skill combinations, and techniques associated with the sport being coached.
  • Standard 28 - Identify, develop, and apply competitive sport strategies and specific tactics appropriate for the age and skill levels of the participating athletes.
  • Standard 29 - Use scouting methods for planning practices, game preparation, and game analysis.

Domain 7 - Organization and Administration

  • Standard 30 - Demonstrate efficiency in contest management.
  • Standard 31 - Be involved in public relation activities for the sport program.
  • Standard 32 - Manage human resources for the program.
  • Standard 33 - Manage fiscal resources for the program.
  • Standard 34 - Facilitate planning, implementation, and documentation of the emergency action plan.
  • Standard 35 - Manage all information, documents, and records for the program.
  • Standard 36 - Fulfill all legal responsibilities and risk management procedures associated with coaching.

Domain 8 - Evaluation

  • Standard 37 - Implement effective evaluation techniques for team performance in relation to established goals.
  • Standard 38 - Use a variety of strategies to evaluate athlete motivation and individual performance as they relate to season objectives and goals.
  • Standard 39 - Utilize an effective and objective process for evaluation of athletes in order to assign roles or positions and establish individual goals.
  • Standard 40 - Utilize an objective and effective process for evaluation of self and staff.

The following materials will be developed throughout the Coaching Minor curriculum and could or must (marked by an asterisk) be included in your Employment Portfolio. The portfolio must be organized into sections.

The assessment rubrics given to you by your instructor for your assignments must be attached to the artifact. Please refer to the Employment Portfolio Checklist for assessment information.

  • Table of contents*
  • Cover letter(s)
    • COACHING-492 Letter of application*
  • Resume
    • COACHING-492*
  • List of all coaching courses*
    • Course numbers
    • Titles of courses
    • Credits
    • Grades
  • Coaching philosophy*
    • COACHING-240
  • Transcript*
  • One letter of recommendation and two additional references*
  • Coaching Field Study Supervisor Evaluation and any other relevant evaluations*
  • Artifacts representing the National Association of Sport and Physical Education Coaching Standards from selected course work:
    • The National Association of Sport and Physical Education National Coaching Standards include the following eight domains:
      Domain 1 - Philosophy and Ethics
      Domain 2 - Safety and Injury Prevention
      Domain 3 - Physical Conditioning
      Domain 4 - Growth and Development
      Domain 5 - Teaching and Communication
      Domain 6 - Sport Skills and Tactics
      Domain 7 - Organization and Administration
      Domain 8 - Evaluation

      ARTIFACTS
      • Examples of Computer Skills (2 examples must be provided)*:
        • Word processing skills
        • Graph development
        • Spreadsheet development
        • PowerPoint presentation
        • Email
        • Web site references related to coaching
        • Web page development
        • Other computer related skills
      • Student Projects (2 examples must be provided):
        • COACHING-240 Coaching Philosophy Paper
        • COACHING-255 Weight and Conditioning Program Design
        • COACHING-256 Drill Development Using Goal Setting
        • COACHING-351 Basketball Scouting Report
        • COACHING-352 Baseball Coaching Philosophy
        • COACHING-353 Track and Field Coaching Handbook
        • COACHING-356 Wrestling Related Issue Project
        • COACHING-356 Wrestling Handbook
        • COACHING-359 Volleyball Paper
        • COACHING-460 Position Paper
        • COACHING-492 Project
        • Other coaching related project
      • TWO EXAMPLES FROM THE LIST BELOW MUST BE PROVIDED
      • Reading List:
        • COACHING-240 web sites
        • COACHING-256 web sites
        • Other reading list
      • Journals:
        • COACHING-492 Journals
        • Other journal activities
      • Article Critiques:
        • COACHING-255
        • COACHING-356
        • Other article critique activities
      • Analytical Work:
        • COACHING-351 Scouting Report
        • COACHING-461 Position Paper
        • Other analytical work
      • Self-Assessments:
        • COACHING-240
        • COACHING-256
        • Other self-assessments
      • Application of Concepts:
        • COACHING-250 Skill Analysis Project
        • COACHING-255 Weight and Conditioning Program
        • COACHING-256 Developing Practice Drills Using Goal Setting
        • Other examples of application of concepts
      • Goal Statements:
        • COACHING-240 Professional Coaching Goals*
        • COACHING-492 Field Study Goals
        • Other goal statements
      • Interviews:
      • Observations:
        • COACHING-351 Basketball Scouting Report
        • COACHING-352 Students Observe a Practice and Game
        • COACHING-359 Students Observe Volleyball Match
        • Other observations
      • Critical Thinking Skills:
        • COACHING-250 Biomechanical analysis of movement
        • COACHING-460 Position Paper
        • COACHING-461 Evaluation of joint
        • COACHING-492 Goals and Objectives
        • Other examples of critical thinking skills
      • Reflections:
        • COACHING-240 Developing a Coaching Philosophy
      • Web site self-assessments:
        • COACHING-240
        • COACHING-256
        • Other examples of reflection
      • Case studies:
        • COACHING-461 Injury Assessments
        • Other examples of case studies
      • Other Examples of artifacts Selected by the Student:

*Download the Portfolio Checklist