General Education Program
Students

Contact Information

Elizabeth Hachten
General Education Coordinator
Phone: (262) 472-1713
Location: Laurentide Hall 4106

General Education Electives

Exploring the Electives (Effective Fall 2018)

You have probably looked at the requirements for your planned degree and major, but remember that you also have the opportunity to take electives - courses that you pick to explore areas that you are interested in. The choices you make can be exciting and might even lead to new areas of study that you had not considered, and they also can help fulfill your general education requirements.

UW- Whitewater offers more than 250 general education elective courses. With so many options available, sometimes the choices are hard to make. To help guide your decisions, the general education elective course are divided into nine categories. Begin your explorations by using the links below to find out more about the types of courses in each category.

Descriptions of the Elective Categories

Courses in this area focus on artistic concepts, structures, and forms providing immersion in and exposure to visual, performing, and creative arts. Some classes emphasize the history and appreciation of the arts while others provide the opportunity to create or perform artistic works. Students will develop critical, creative, and interpretive skills as well as an understanding of the relationship between art, creativity, and the broader social and cultural context. 


Courses in this area focus on individuals and communities within the United States whose identities and experiences are shaped by discrepancies in power, privilege and access. Drawing from a variety of disciplines, these classes address factors that many include gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, ability, immigration status, and others. Students will enhance their intercultural knowledge and skills, and in particular learn to articulate and respect the perspectives that arise from these differing experience while critically examining their own values, perspectives and biases. Courses may also provide opportunities to put this learning into practice through experiences with diverse individuals or groups. 


Courses in this area provide the opportunity to explore world cultures or global systems through the study of a world language, history and culture of another country, or issues and concepts that are relevant across social and political boundaries. Drawing from different disciplinary perspectives, these courses emphasize awareness of commonalities of the human experience as well as the factors and experiences that differentiate cultures and countries. Students will develop skills and knowledge that will help them meet the challenges of a diverse and ever-changing world as an informed and responsible citizen. 


Courses in this area examine the diversity of human experience and expression from historical, philosophical, religious, literary, and/or linguistic perspectives. These courses usually focus on the traditions, beliefs, texts, and artifacts that make up a culture, and place emphasis on critical analysis and interpretation of primary sources. Students will enhance their critical and creative thinking and communication skills, and grapple with complexity and diverse perspectives. 


Courses in this area will explore the phenomena of the natural world in the context of everyday life and contemporary problems. Through a variety of disciplines, these courses will encourage curiosity and appreciation of scientific discovery and inquiry through the examination of scientific processes. Students will develop their ability to read and comprehend scientific information and use that information to make judgements and draw appropriate conclusions about its influence on the world around them. 


Courses in this area will explore the phenomena of the natural world in the context of everyday life and contemporary problems. Through a variety of disciplines, these courses will encourage curiosity and appreciation of scientific discovery and inquiry through the examination of scientific processes. Students will develop their ability to read and comprehend scientific information and use that information to make judgements and draw appropriate conclusions about its influence on the world around them. 

Additionally, GL courses will include hands-on scientific experimentation in which the students will perform scientific processes to collect and/or analyze data to answer scientific questions. Students will understand the process of obtaining and evaluating scientific knowledge and how it impacts society and technological growth. 


Courses in this area will enhance students' quantitative reasoning skills, including their capacity to explain, interpret, evaluate, and communicate quantitative information. Students will learn to use models or algorithms to solve problems, and will apply quantitative concepts to real-world situations. These skills may be drawn from mathematics and computational strategies, but may extend to logic, statistics, and inductive or deductive reasoning. 


Courses in this area focus on the scientific study of human behavior, culture, and society. They may examine individual behavior, interpersonal interactions, or interactions between people and the broader social, political, economic, or natural environment. Students will develop the ability to think critically about these issues, and apply appropriate theories and quantitative and qualitative methods to analyze and evaluate social problems. 


Courses in this area will explore knowledge and behaviors that are essential to enjoying a healthy and fulfilling lifestyle. Courses may emphasize a range of topic including, health, physical fitness, learning and time management, and personal and career development. Students will develop lifelong learning skills such as self-monitoring, reflection, educated decision-making, and implementing strategies for personal change.