LEARN Center
placeholder header

LEARN Center Workshops 2018-2019

2018-19 Learn Center Workshops

 

"An Introduction to Sustainability at UW-Whitewater"

Thursday, March 21
12:30-1:45 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259A

Our campus is committed to the principle that meeting the environmental, social, and economic needs of the present should not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs. But what does this commitment look like on our campus, and how you can you be involved in these efforts? In this workshop the Sustainability Coordinator for campus will provide an introduction to sustainability at UW-Whitewater and the current Sustainability Fellow will give examples of how faculty and academic staff have incorporated sustainability into their teaching and research. The workshop will end with an interactive component whereby attendees can discuss their ideas with colleagues and can contribute to a broader discussion about how the university might institutionalize professional development opportunities for faculty and academic staff to infuse sustainability into their work.


Participants will gain:

  • An understanding of current sustainability efforts on campus and opportunities available for faculty and academic staff to get involved in those efforts
  • Examples of how faculty and academic staff can incorporate sustainability into their work and time for attendees to discuss with colleagues their ideas for including sustainability in their work
  • A chance for attendees to influence the direction of future sustainability initiatives on campus related to curriculum and research

 

Presentations by:
Wesley Enterline, Sustainability Coordinator
Jonah Ralston, Sustainability Fellow

Thursday, March 21
12:30-1:45 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259A


 

Back to top

 

"Back to Basics to Balance Workload"

How can you get more done but not spend a lot more time doing it? The LTC/LEARN Center collaborative series for the 2018-19 year will focus on improving your teaching practice and student learning without adding to your workload.


Session Five:
Designing Rubrics to Make Your Assignments More Transparent and Your Grading Simpler

Wednesday, March 6
12:00-1:30 p.m.
University Center, Room 259A

pd

Transparent assignments help students understand both the HOW and the WHY they are learning content in particular ways. This workshop will explore methods to build assignments that define the learning benefits to students. Learn how to build assignments that provide clear criteria for success, articulate skills practice, define content knowledge gained, and list tasks to be completed. We will explore a case study and review the same assignment from different approaches; then apply those skills to YOUR assignments to rework them with an emphasis on transparency and ease of grading. This will be a working session, so bring one of your assignments with that you would like to modify.


Participants will gain:

  • Explore different ways to rework assignments to have a more clear purpose
  • Define success criteria for transparency
  • Configure Canvas rubrics to reflect these criteria to simplify grading

 

Presentations by:
Jessica Bonjour, Chemistry
Tedd Witt, LTC

Wednesday, March 6
12:00-1:30 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259A

Register by February 27


 

Back to top

 

"Online Tools for Graduate Development"

Session 1 - Designing and Facilitating- Synchronous Course

Date: Monday, March 4, 9AM-10AM, McGraw 112

Objectives:

  • Understand key design and facilitation aspects that make for quality online learning experiences
  • Evaluate synchronous and asynchronous modes
  • Apply backward design and analysis (what is the best way to achieve your objectives-links to asynchronous v.s. synchronous)

Topics:

  • Introduce applicable online benchmarks to design and facilitate quality online courses
  • Framework: Moore's Theory of Interactivity

Session 2 - Designing and Facilitating- Asynchronous active learning in online graduate courses

Date: Monday, March 18, 9AM-10AM, McGraw 112

Objectives:

  • Evaluate designs and strategies for online courses

Topics:

  • GOOD asynchronous discussion board conversations

Session 3 - Facilitating Seminars in the Online Environment

Date: Monday, April 8, 9AM-10AM, McGraw 112

Objectives:

  • Differentiate between design and delivery (facilitation)
  • Managing student expectations

Topics:

  • Setting it up- Using the tool (e.g., Webex Meetings)
  • Facilitating Sessions/ interaction

Session 4 - High Impact Multimedia: video, audio, podcasts

Date: Monday, April 22, 9AM-10AM, McGraw 112

Objectives:

  • Review research on what works
  • When is the best time to use them? For what purpose?
  • Explore easy to use tools to create video and audio content (for instructors or students)

Topics:

  • Benchmarks around multimedia content
  • Best practices and accessibility
  • Tour of the LTC video studio and Kleerboard

Session 5 - Peer Review, Groups, & Engaging Interactive Graduate Learning Activities

Date: Monday, May 6, 9AM-10AM, McGraw 112

Objectives:

  • Pedagogy behind facilitating peer activities and group work online

Topics:

  • Common peer activities, when they work, & how to set them up
  • Small group work, scaffolding bigger projects, accountability
  • Introduce technology tools that can facilitate them (Webex Teams, Canvas, Peermark)

Session 6 - Celebrating Teaching & Learning Conference

Date: Wednesday, May 22, UC

Objectives:

  • Apply aspects of media richness theory to online graduate course development
  • Develop activities that promote social presence in the course design
  • Learn more: http://blogs.uww.edu/ctl/

If you have any questions about this workshop, please contact Matthew Vick
at vickm@uww.edu or 262-472-6215.

Back to top

 

"Making (and Measuring) Your Scholarly Impact"

Thursday, February 28
12:00-1:00 p.m.
University Center, Room 068

pd

How’s your research coming along? Very well, we hope. Deciding where and how you want to be published is a big deal. Do you know the best journals that publish in your field? How about reputable ones that can publish quickly on your topic? This hands-on workshop will guide you through finding the best venues for your research, including avoiding predatory publishers. And after you have published? We will show you where you can find your article or book’s impact, and how Google Profile and ORCID can track your published work. Bring your laptop or tablet!


Participants will gain:

  • Insights into impact metrics for journals and published works
  • Skills for recognizing the quality of journals and publishers, and the best journals for your research
  • Methods for making your research more discoverable

 

Presentations by:
Ellen Latorraca
Naomi Schemm
Martha Stephenson

Thursday, February 28
12:00-1:00 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 068

Register by February 21


 

Back to top

 

"QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) Suicide Prevention Training"

"Three steps anyone can learn to prevent suicide"

Suicide prevention is something in which we can all take an active role. The goal of this presentation is to help you gain a better understanding of how to intervene when someone in your life is struggling with any thoughts or plans of suicide. QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) is a simple and effective approach to helping people in distress.


Participants will gain:

  • Recent trends behind campus data that highlight the value and importance of a suicide prevention program
  • How to recognize and address suicide clues and warning signs
  • What on and off campus resources are available to assist students and employees in distress

 

Presentations by:
Andrew Browning, CARE Team Case Manager Dean of Students Office

Thursday, February 12
12:00-2:00 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 261

Register by February 5


 

Back to top

 

"Back to Basics to Balance Workload"

How can you get more done but not spend a lot more time doing it? The LTC/LEARN Center collaborative series for the 2018-19 year will focus on improving your teaching practice and student learning without adding to your workload.

Session Three:
Using Groups to Engage Students & Maximize Instructor Time: Conversation About How to Use Team Projects in the Classroom

Tuesday, November 27
12:30-1:45 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259A

pd

Well-structured group work can produce a more meaningful learning experience for students. Instructors are the critical factor in facilitating a successful environment for that meaningful work to occur. This workshop will review the benefits of group work in the classroom, the conditions needed for successful implementation, and provide tools to assist in transforming a traditional classroom setting into a thriving group environment.


Participants will gain:

  • Learn why we use group work as a classroom strategy
  • Identify the benefits of group work in the classroom
  • Learn strategies for employing group work in assignments
  • Take away practical tools/ resources for instructors to use

 

Presentations by:
Eric Loepp, Political Science
Michele Peetz, Management

Tuesday, November 27
12:30-1:45 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259A

Register by November 20


 

Back to top

 

Building Effective, Sustainable Community Based
Learning Partnerships

Thursday, November 15
12:00-1:00 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259A

This panel discussion will be comprised of two parts. The first will feature two 2017 Community Based Learning Fellows and their community partners. They will discuss strategies and tips for building effective community based learning partnerships, sharing details of their experience building and modifying their CBL courses. The other half of the session will feature Trina Van Schyndel, the Wisconsin Campus Compact Executive Director, who will give a presentation on best practices for building CBL Partnerships that utilize an asset-based model for sustainability and success. She will also discuss how to take an inventory of needs.


Participants will gain:

  • Best practices in CBL partnership-building
  • Strategies for sustaining CBL partnerships
  • Roles and responsibilities for partners and faculty

 

Presentations by:
Andrea Ednie, Associate Professor, Internship Coordinator Health,
Human Performance & Recreation
Brain Robinson, Director of Leisure Services Fairhaven Senior Services
Kelly Hatch, Assistant Professor Curriculum & Instruction
Representative from the Ice Age Trail Alliance
Trina Van Schyndel, Executive Director Wisconsin Campus Compact

Thursday, November 15
12:00-1:00 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room TBA

Register by November 8


 

Back to top

 

Don't Cheat at Chapter 14 - Copy Our Notes Instead!

Wednesday, November 14
12:00- 1:15 p.m., Lunch Included
Hyland Hall, Room 4303

Are you a faculty or staff member who currently instructs any graded course offered by UWW? If yes, it is important for you to know how to navigate the UWS Chapter 14 academic misconduct process efficiently. Attend this LEARN Center workshop if you'd like to brush up on your academic misconduct investigation skills, receive up-to-date process checklists and letter templates, or want to ask specific questions about the academic misconduct process.


Participants will gain:

  • Attendees will learn how to use the UWS Chapter 14 academic misconduct process to efficiently and accurately adjudicate accusations of cheating, plagiarism, unauthorized collaboration, falsification of information or data, and other types of academic misconduct.
  • Attendees will learn how to approach and communicate with a student when they suspect a student has engaged in academic misconduct. Additionally, attendees will learn how to ask specific questions to determine if academic misconduct took place, and what types of notes they'll need to take to move forward.
  • Attendees will learn how to appropriately document an accusation of misconduct, and how to write the accompanying letters that are delivered to the student and kept on file with the University. Attendees will receive letter template(s), flow charts, and an outline of how to complete an academic misconduct investigation start-to-finish that will ensure the due-process rights of the student are met.

 

Presentations by:
Tim Fredrickson

Wednesday, November 14
12:00- 1:15 p.m., Lunch Included
Hyland Hall, Room 4303

Register by November 7


 

Back to top

 

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Impacted Student Veterans

Monday, November 5
12:00- 1:00 p.m., Lunch Included
University, Room 259B

There are more than four-hundred Veterans and Military Service Members on campus. An unknown number of them have returned from combat zones with invisible wounds of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and/or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). A recent survey of 14,673 staff and faculty members from twenty geographically dispersed U.S. Colleges revealed that more than 70% of them do not feel adequately prepared to recognize when Student-Veterans are exhibiting signs of TBI and/or PTSD. This workshop is designed to assist staff and faculty members in creating a supportive environment for our Student-Veteran and Military Service Members that may be exhibiting signs of TBI and/ or PTSD. 


Participants will gain:

  • The current statistics on the prevalence of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among Veterans and Military Service Members on college campuses
  • The most common signs and symptoms exhibited by Veterans and Military Service Members impacted by Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Effective strategies that can be used by staff and faculty members to support Veterans and Military Service Members impacted by Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Presentations by:
Tim Fredrickson

Monday, November 5
12:00- 1:00 p.m., Lunch Included
University, Room 259B

Register by November 3


 

Back to top

 

2018-19 UW-Whitewater LEARN Center/Learning Technology Center Workshop Series

"Back to Basics to Balance Workload"

How can you get more done but not spend a lot more time doing it? The LTC/LEARN Center collaborative series for the 2018-19 year will focus on improving your teaching practice and student learning without adding to your workload.

Session Two:
Focused Strategies for Providing Formative Assessment

Thursday, October 18
12:30-1:45 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259A

pd

At this workshop, panelists will draw on current pedagogy to discuss strategies for providing focused feedback to students as they are engaged in active learning activities. Some of the strategies will be time-saving. Others, though they require time, might help instructors direct feedback in productive ways to foster student learning and development. An LTC representative will also be available to provide a brief overview of some feedback tools in Canvas, along with tips for utilizing them.


Participants will gain:

  • Strategies to strengthen students' own academic habits
  • Activities to coach deeper thinking
  • Strategies for providing feedback collectively and for designing assignments to head off future problems

 

Presentations by:
Dana Prodoehl
Alexis Piper
Trudi Witonsky

Thursday, October 18
12:30-1:45 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259A

Register by October 11


 

Back to top

 

Back to Basics to Balance Workload:
Efficient and Effective Communication Strategies

Thursday, September 20
12:30-1:45 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259A

pd

In this first session of the series, we will discuss how to effectively communicate with students while also making good use of your available time. Good interactions between instructors and students start with setting expectations and boundaries for appropriate times, methods, and places for communications. We will discuss considerations and options to do this in the syllabus, as well as in the class or online. Learning to identify early indications that your students are struggling and then determine when, how, and if to intervene can play a large role in student retention and success. We will discuss various factors to evaluate and identify appropriate resources for academic interventions to help students before it's too late. When it comes to using your time well, remember "a stitch in time saves nine".

Participants will gain:

  • Guidelines for establishing expectations and boundaries for communication between instructors and students
  • Evaluate strategies for determining academic "at-risk" students and tips for how and when to facilitate academic interventions
  • Methods to use CANVAS for additional ways to communicate with students.

 

Presentation by:
Ted Witt, LTC
Heather Pelzel, Biological Sciences and LEARN Center

Thursday, September 20
12:30-1:45 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259A

Register by September 14


 

Back to top

 

What Makes an Educational Experience High Impact?
NASH Grant HIPS Workshop

Thursday, September 20
12:30-1:45 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259A

In this workshop we will explore a set of quality indicators for high-impact practices as proposed by the National Association of System Heads (NASH). These quality indicators are meant to both guide and reflect the nature of high-impact practices across programs and institutions that will promote learning for all students. As a participant in the Taking Student Success to Scale grant, the UW System has the opportunity to apply these quality indicators to existing or newly designed high-impact practices to examine how these attributes are affirmed or how they may guide further refinement of the HIPs offerings on our campuses. Participants will then complete a mapping activity to apply the quality indicators to their own high-impact practices and reflect how their HIPs align with the new vision for HIPs.

The workshop ends with a look at integrative learning, an opportunity for students to demonstrate how they apply, analyze, and synthesize their knowledge in the HIPs learning experience. Participants will examine integrative learning outcomes and assessment practices.

Monday, October 1, 2018, 11:30am

Location: University Center 259B
Lunch will be provided

UW System Presenters:
Carleen Vande Zande, Associate Vice President,
Academic Programs & Educational Innovation
Fay Y. Akindes, Director, Systemwide
Professional & Instructional Development

Register by September 28


 

Back to top

 

Emerging from the Filter Bubble: Helping Students Go from Confirmation Bias to Cross-Check

Thursday, September 13
12:00-1:30 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259

pd

Fake news did not begin with the invention of the printing press, but existed long before. It has reared its head in waves over the centuries and is now in the forefront of our minds again. This hands-on workshop will give you the tools you and your students need to recognize and evaluate purposefully deceptive text and images. We will be covering a short history of fake news, where it is often currently encountered, confirmation bias, and sample activities to try and take with you.*


Participants will learn:

  • Insights into the origin of fake news
  • Knowledge about the types of fake news
  • Skills and activities for recognizing and evaluating images, articles, and facts for veracity.

 

Presentations by:
Martha Stephenson, Reference and Instruction Librarian
Diana Shull, Reference and Instruction Librarian

Thursday, September 13
12:00-1:30 p.m., Lunch Included
University Center, Room 259

Register by September 7


 

Back to top

 

Enhancing Your Cultural Navigation Skills to Build a Campus Culture of Belonging

Tuesday, August 28
12-3 p.m. Lunch is included
University Center, Room 275

pd

Dr. Strayhorn will also be providing a workshop entitled: "Enhancing Your Cultural Navigation Skills to Build a Campus Culture of Belonging." This workshop is tailored to provide tools, create conversations, and close equity gaps surrounding belonging. Participants will be exposed to quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods studies that inform engagement in civil discourse. Also, practical recommendations for improving educational environments, practices, policies, and programs to facilitate students' sense of belonging on campus will be provided.

Tuesday, August 28
12-3 p.m. Lunch is included
University Center, Room 275

Register by August 24


 

Back to top

<!--__