2000-2001 Lunch Hour Reading/Discussion Club

Spring 2001 Book Club

Making Our Students Better Thinkers

Developing critical thinking skills is often cited as the most important enterprise in post-secondary education. The readings focus on the theories, processes and varied strategies that dominate the extensive literature about critical thinking. Discussions encourage participants to compare their experiences and perceptions against the concepts in the readings in moving toward a broader understanding of how to develop student thinking skills. Participants will receive a reading packet and schedule in early January.

Facilitator: Mark Lencho, Associate Professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

Sessions Scheduled: in UC 206 from Noon to 1:00pm on the following six Mondays: 29 January; 12 February; 26 February; 12 March; 2 April; and 16 April.

Technology's Effect On Student Learning

This omnipresence of technology in post-secondary education is undeniable. Less clear is its effect on student learning. These sessions review the steadily growing literature examining the relationship between technology and student learning in post-secondary settings. Discussions focus on identifying best practices, examining the limitations, and exploring the untapped potential of technology in improving student learning. Some sessions will be experiential, held in campus computer labs. Participants will be sent a reading packet in early January.

Facilitator: Bob Schramm, MBA On-Line Coordinator, LEARN Center Technology Specialist

Sessions Scheduled: in UC 206 from 12:30pm to 1:30pm on the following six Tuesdays: 30 January; 13 February; 27 February; 13 March; 3 April; and 17 April.

Active Learning:
Methods for Moving Beyond Information-Sharing

The idea of designing instruction such that students become actively engaged in has garnered a life of its own. Discussion focuses on the merits and limitations of active learning, particularly as participants consider discipline-specific applications of active learning principles. These sessions take a close look at the work of, among others, Charles Bonwell, who is scheduled to lead a LEARN Center workshop in August 2001. Participants will receive a reading packet in early January.

Facilitator: Jim Winship, Associate Professor in Social Work Department & Former Director of UW-W Teaching Enhancement Center.

Sessions Scheduled: in UC 206 from Noon to 1:00pm on the following six Wednesdays: 31 January; 14 February; 28 February; 14 March; 4 April; and 18 April.

Fall 2000 Book Club

How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci

Creativity is an invaluable part of the teaching and learning process. Instructors seek innovative ways to engage students. Students seek creative ways to solve problems that are at the heart of post-secondary learning. This group will read and discuss Michael Gelb's best selling, How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci. The discussions will focus on Gelb's seven principles—exploring how such principles integrate in post-secondary instruction generally, and student learning specifically. Participants will be sent a copy of the book early in summer.

Sessions Scheduled: in UC 206 from 12:30pm to 1:30pm on the following six Tuedays: 12 September; 10 October; 14 November; and 5 December.

Scholarship Reconsidered

The demands on the modern faculty member are multiple, and often conflicting. The challenge of balancing teaching with research and service can be vexing. Ernest Boyer's 1990 watershed work, Scholarship Reconsidered, doesn't provide a solution as much as it does a context. The book argues for a "scholarship of teaching," and provides a thorough, thought-provoking, historically-grounded perspective for discussing why we do what we do. Participants will be sent a copy of the book early in summer.

Sessions Scheduled: in UC 206 from Noon to 1:00pm on the following six Wednesdays: 13 September; 11 October; 15 November; and 6 December.