2002-2003 Lunch Hour Reading/Discussion Club

Spring 2003 Book Club

Effective Grading
A Tool for Learning and Assessment

(Barbara E. Walvoord & Virginia Johnson Anderson, 1998, Jossey-Bass)

This unique book explores the myths, functions and missed opportunities of what most faculty identify as the most vexing component of the instructional process: grading. It is chock-full of ideas and examples from diverse disciplines as it guides readers through an examination of such issues as how to design assignments worth grading, how to better manage the grading process, how to use grades to motivate students, and how to grade more efficiently and fairly. Discussion will focus on these and related issues relevant to the practice of grading.

Facilitator: Steve Friedman, Co-Director, LEARN Center, Professor in the Department of Educational Foundations.

Sessions Scheduled: in UC 206 from Noon to 1:00pm on the following six Wednesdays: 29 January; 12 & 26 February; 12 March; and 2 & 16 April.

Teaching About Diversity, Teaching in Multicultural Contexts

(A Reading Packet)

Course material in the broadly defined area of "diversity" (racial, ethnic, cultural)--particularly as it relates to issues of power, justice, and prejudice--is often difficult to teach. It can often be even more difficult as a topic in which to engage students and foster discussion. Issues of culture and fairness also apply to the way we teach, and several authors have raised questions as to whether traditional pedagogy privileges students from some backgrounds more than others. Using a collection of readings, faculty members will discuss these and related issues.

Facilitator: Jim Winship is an Associate Professor in the Social Work Department.

Sessions Scheduled: in UC 206 from Noon to 1:00pm on the following six Mondays: 27 January; 10 & 24 February; 10 & 31 March; and 14 April.

The Course Portfolio
How Faculty Can Examine Their Teaching to Advance Practice and Improve Student Learning

(Pat Hutchings (ed.), 1998, American Association for Higher Education (AAHE))

This book, a by-product of a joint initiative of AAHE and the Carnegie Foundation, is designed to help faculty in all disciplines document evidence of student learning. It explores the components of, the process of developing, and the diverse uses of a course portfolio--a sort of "laboratory notebook for faculty research into student learning." The book also shares examples of portfolios developed by faculty in disciplines ranging from literature to math, from history to nursing. Discussion will center on practical issues relevant to the development and use of a course portfolio.

Facilitator: Dar Habanek is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Foundations.

Sessions Scheduled: in UC 206 from 12:30pm to 1:30pm on the following six Tuesdays: 28 January; 11 & 25 February; 11 March; and 1 & 15 April.

Fall 2002 Book Club

Redesigning Higher Education
Producing Dramatic Gains in Student Learning

(Lion F. Gardiner, 1994, ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report)

Labeled one of the "most important works about higher education to be written in the last decade," Gardiner's book reviews empirical literature and argues that postsecondary education has largely failed to develop an evolving student population, and examines how revisions to curriculums, instructional and advising practices, and campus climates, can aid us in radically improving student learning. It's a natural follow-up for Gardiner's day-long visit to the campus on 27 August 2002, and a catalyst for discussion about our campus-wide, departmental, and personal practices.

Facilitator: Greg Valde, Associate Professor, Educational Foundations Department.

Sessions Scheduled: in UC 206 from Noon to 1:00pm on the following six Wednesdays: 11 & 25 September; 9 & 23 October; and 6 & 20 November.

Sparks of Genius
13 Thinking Tools of the World's Most Creative People

(Robert & Michele Root-Bernstein, 1999, Houghton Mifflin)

The authors identify 13 "thinking tools" that were at the heart of such extraordinary and diverse thinkers as Albert Einstein, Jane Goodall, Amadeus Mozart and Virginia Woolf. Participants will explore the role of such tools in fostering creative thinking, disciplinary and interdisciplinary thinking, and lifelong learning. Discussion will focus on the pragmatic challenges and potential strategies for cultivating and enhancing such skills in ourselves and our students.

Facilitators: Colette Dollarhide, Assistant Professor, Counseling Department; and William Powell, Professor, Social Work Department.

Sessions Scheduled: in UC 206 from 12:30pm to 1:30pm on the following six Tuesdays: 10 & 24 September; 8 & 22 October; and 5 & 19 November.