2015-2016 Lunch Hour Reading/Discussion Club

Spring 2016 Book Groups

Real Happiness at Work: Mediations for Accomplishment, Achievement, and Peace

By: Sharon Salzberg

People with learning disabilities are often stigmatized, and tend not to self-disclose and/or ask for needed help in classroom. This book is an anthology of personal accounts and scholarly essays exploring the various facets of living with learning disabilities. We hope to stimulate an interactive discussion about the educational, social and emotional experiences people with learning disabilities have in the classroom.

Facilitator: Wade Dazey, Philosophy and Religious Studies and Liz Hachten, College of Letters and Sciences

Meeting times/dates: Wednesdays 12:30-1:30 pm (January 20, February 3 and 17, March 2 and 30, and April 13 and 27)

RSVP by Wednesday, December 18, 2015

Getting College Ready: Latin@ Student Experiences of Race, Access, and Belonging at Predominantly White Universities

By: Julie Minikel-Lacocque

This book examines data from an in-depth qualitative study of six Latin@ students transitioning to a public, predominantly White university. Through the voices and experiences of these students and various university support staff members, the book challenges the ways we understand college access, school success, college preparation, race and racism, and the tenuous relationship between religious fundamentalism and public schooling.

Facilitator: Julie Minikel-Lacocque, Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction

Meeting times/dates: Mondays 1:00-2:00 pm (January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29, and March 7 and 14)

RSVP by Wednesday, December 18, 2015

The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog: And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist's Notebook. What Traumatized Children Can Teach us about Loss, Love, and Healing

By: Bruce Perry and Maia Szalavitz

Bruce Perry, a child psychiatrist in Texas, presents case studies illustrating the impact of trauma. He shares what he has learned from these children that can be useful for all of us to understand about trauma, its impact, and ways to help those who have survived. Perry weaves information about brain development and the impact of trauma throughout and sets the tone for his neurosequential approach to trauma treatment.

Facilitator: David Van Doren, Associate Professor, Counselor Education and Cindy Anderton, Assistant Professor, Counselor Education

Meeting times/dates: Thursdays 12:30-1:30 pm (January 28, February 11 and 25, March 10, and 31, and April 14)

RSVP by Wednesday, December 18, 2015

Contemplative Learning and Inquiry Across the Disciplines

Edited By: Olen Gunnlaugson, Edward W. Sarath, Charles Scott, and Heesoon Bai

The editors have brought together contributors from a variety of disciplines including education, management & leadership studies, information sciences, social sciences, the arts, and humanities. As a result, the book allows for exploration of contemplative approaches in higher education from a variety of perspectives. We would like to continue that diversity of perspective in this discussion group – encouraging participation from across campus to share in leading and discussing selected chapters.

Facilitator: Carolyn Morgan, Professor of Psychology and Barbara Beaver, Professor of Psychology & Director, the LEARN Center

Meeting times/dates: Tuesdays 12:30-1:30 pm (February 2 and 16, March 1, 15, and 29, and April 12 and 26)

RSVP by Wednesday, December 18, 2015

Learning Disabilities and Life Stories

By: Andrew Garrod, Mary Lynn Boscardin, and Pano Rodis

People with learning disabilities are often stigmatized, and tend not to self-disclose and/or ask for needed help in classroom. This book is an anthology of personal accounts and scholarly essays exploring the various facets of living with learning disabilities. We hope to stimulate an interactive discussion about the educational, social and emotional experiences people with learning disabilities have in the classroom.

Facilitator: Juk Bhattacharyya, Associate Professor, Geography, Geology, and Environmental Science and Karen Fisher, Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Center for Students with Disabilities

Meeting times/dates: Wednesdays 3:00-4:00 pm (February 3 and 17, March 2, 16, and 30, and April 13 and 27)

RSVP by Wednesday, December 18, 2015

Fall 2015 Book Groups

The Big Read Book Club

Facilitator: Shannon Dozoryst

When Willa Cather’s editor first read the manuscript of My Antonia, he experienced “the most thrilling shock of recognition of the real thing” he had ever felt. Few books pack so much vibrantly genuine life into their pages as this classic novel of the American immigrant experience. My Antonia teems with romance, violence, tenderness, cruelty, comedy and tragedy – all bustling side by side in a narrative at once compassionate and gripping.

Meeting times/dates: 12:00-1:00pm on November 3, 10, 17, 24, and December 1

Room: Andersen Library, 2nd Floor Lounge

Sign Up by October 6, 2015

2015 Winner of the Chancellor’s Regional Literary Award
see article


Shotgun Lovesongs

By: Nickolas Butler

Shotgun Lovesongs is a story about four boyhood friends all born and raised in a small Wisconsin town. They have all taken different paths with varying degrees of success. They meet again for a wedding in their 30s in the small Wisconsin town. Although the childhood bonds are strong, they face unexpected stresses as they meet again and wives and friends interact. Interwoven in the story is their encounters with Beth, a woman who played a special role in each of their lives.

As mentioned on Butler’s website: “Seldom has the American heartland been so richly and accurately portrayed. Though the town may have changed, the one thing that hasn’t is the beauty of the Wisconsin farmland, the lure of which, in Nickolas Butler’s hands, emerges as a vibrant character in the story. Shotgun Lovesongs is that rare work of fiction that evokes a specific time and place yet movingly describes the universal human condition. It is, in short, a truly remarkable book—a novel that once read will never be forgotten.”

Given that Nickolas Butler has been named the winner of the 2015 Chancellor’s Regional Literary Award, the book club will provide an opportunity to explore the themes of the book. Bookclub members will have the opportunity to meet with the author when he is on campus in October 2015 to accept the award.

Facilitator: Praveen Parboteeah (DBA Director) and Alvaro Taveira (Chair of Department of Occupational & Environmental Safety & Health)

Meeting times/dates: Tuesdays 3:30-4:30 pm (September 8, 15, 22, 29, and October 6) Meet with author in October

Room: TBD

Please RSVP by June 1, 2015

The Heart of Higher Education: A Call To Renewal

By: Parker J. Palmer & Arthur Zajonc

In The Heart of Higher Education: A Call to Renewal, the authors propose an approach to educational renewal grounded in collegiality and conversation.  Please join us for conversations on Palmer and Zajonc's philosophy of integrative education.  We'll explore the meaning of higher education, considering the authors' analysis, theory and options for action. As noted by the authors, The Heart of Higher Education is "... for all who are new to the field of integrative education, all who want to deepen their understanding of its challenges and prospects, and all who want to practice and promote this vital approach to teaching and learning on their campuses."

Facilitator: Barbara Beaver (Professor of Psychology, Director LEARN Center) and Carolyn Morgan (Professor of Psychology)

Meeting times/dates: Thursdays 12:30-1:30 pm (September 17, October 1, 15, November 5, 19, and December 3)

Room: TBD

RSVP by Friday, May 22, 2015

The Value of the Humanities

By: Helen H. Small

What role should the humanities play in the twenty-first century?  How are the humanities necessary for our new global reality?  In order to understand our present and future, we need to understand our past.The Value of the Humanities provides a context for discussing the role that the humanities should play today by examining in clear and approachable language the major claims that have been made in favor of the humanities.  Among the arguments considered are the following:  the humanities are necessary to understanding the meaning-making practices of culture; the humanities, although useful in a number of ways, offer a value that is admirably at odds with a hegemonic utilitarian understanding of society; the humanities contribute to human happiness; the humanities are a force for democracy; and the humanities are good in and of themselves.

All interested in the future of the university and our educational system generally as well as the role of education should play in our changing global reality will be interested in the discussion, including those interested in General Education and the LEAP Initiative.

All interested in the future of the university and our educational system generally as well as the role of education should play in our changing global reality will be interested in the discussion, including those interested in General Education and the LEAP Initiative.

Facilitator: Elena Levy-Navarro (Professor, Languages and Literatures Department)

Meeting times/dates: Wednesdays 3:30-4:30 pm (September 9, 23, October 7, 21, November 4, 18, December 2, 9)

Room: TBD

RSVP by Friday, May 22, 2015

Bridging the Gender Gap: Seven Principles for Achieving Gender Balance

By: Lynn Roseberry and Johan Roos

Despite decades of attention on gender and equality, most leadership positions in business, government, and education continue to be occupied by men. Bridging the Gender Gap explores recent research from multiple disciplines to identify root causes and dismantle myths that inhibit the equal distribution of men and women in positions of power and leadership. All members of the UWW community are invited to join us for thought provoking discussions on closing the gender gap and empowering leadership on campus and beyond.

Facilitator: Carol Scovotti (Professor of Marketing and Fulbright Scholar), Juk Bhattacharyya (Associate Professor, Geography, Geology & Environmental Science), and Karen Wislocky (English Language Academy Coordinator)

Meeting times/dates: Wednesdays 12:00-1:00 pm (September 16, 30, October 14, 28, November 11, and December 2)

Room: TBD

RSVP by Friday, May 22, 2015

Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do

By: Claude M. Steele, Ph.D. in Social Psychology. Currently Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost, UC Berkeley

A stereotype threat occurs when any individual feels at risk for confirming a negative stereotype about one's group. This threat often leads to negative consequences such as compromised achievement. Social psychologist Claude M. Steele looks at racial and gender gaps in test scores, stereotypes about athleticism and others, and how they shape identity. He also provides a plan for reducing stereotype threats.

Facilitator: Leda Nath (Professor) and Kristen Lavelle (Assistant Professor). Department of Sociology, Criminology, and Anthropology

Meeting times/dates: Tuesdays 12:30-1:30 pm (September 15, 29, October 13, 27, November 10, and December 1)

Room: TBD

RSVP by Friday, May 22, 2015