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2018-2019 Lunch Hour Reading/Discussion Club

Spring 2019 Book Groups

The Slow Professor Discussion Group
"The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy"

By: Maggie Berg & Barbara K. Seeber

Join us for five meetings this spring to discuss The Slow Professor. This book is intended to provide faculty and academic staff the opportunity to pause to think deeply about the state of the academy and their participation in it, and to be able to re-engage with the primary aims of the professoriate

If there is one sector of society that should be cultivating deep thought in itself and others, it is academia. Yet the corporatisation of the contemporary university has sped up the clock, demanding increased speed and efficiency from faculty regardless of the consequences for education and scholarship. In The Slow Professor, Maggie Berg and Barbara K. Seeber discuss how adopting the principles of the Slow movement in academic life can counter this erosion of humanistic education. Focusing on the individual faculty member and his or her own professional practice, Berg and Seeber present both an analysis of the culture of speed in the academy and ways of alleviating stress while improving teaching, research, and collegiality

Facilitators:
Jonah Ralston, Political Science & Laura Porterfield, Educational Foundations



Meeting times/dates:
Mondays 3:30-4:30 p.m.

February 4, February 11, February 18, February 25, & March 4

Location:

UC 068


 
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Real-Time Student Assessment Discussion Group
"Real-Time Student Assessment: Meeting the Imperative for Improved Time to Degree, Closing the Opportunity Gap, and Assuring Student Competencies for 21st-Century Needs"

By: Peggy Maki

Join us for five meetings this spring to discuss Real-Time Student Assessment. Do our assessment of student learning initiatives benefit current students?

Real-time student assessment allows continuous improvement of instruction to support students as they progress through their programs, rather than focusing on changes that may benefit future students. What are the assumptions on which this approach rests, and how can you use it in your courses and programs? We will discuss these questions and examine cases of institutions using real-time student assessment to support student success.


Meeting Plan:

Session 1: Why Equity Matters (Chapter 1)
Session 2: Outcomes-Based Frameworks - Evidence at UWW (Chapter 2)
Session 3: Canvas of core learner-centered commitments and Guiding Principles (Chapters 3 and 4)
Session 4: Technology that contributes to real-time assessment (Chapter 5)
Session 5: Positioning UWW within the 5 case studies and brainstorming for UWW & it's programs


Facilitators:
Andrea Ednie, Program Coordinator for Health, Human Performance, and Recreation,
Assessment Fellow
Jolly Emry, Chair of Political Science
Joan Littlefield Cook, Director of Academic Assessment

Space is limited
Book and refreshments provided.


Meeting times/dates:
Wednesdays 12:00-1:00 p.m.

February 13, February 27, March 6, March 20, April 3, & April 17

Location:

TBD


 
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Visual Media Theory Discussion Group
"The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction" by Walter Benjamin
"Ontology of the Photographic Image" by Andre Bazin
"Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema" by Laura Mulvey
"The Medium is the Message" by Marshall McLuhan
"We: Variant of a Manifesto"

Join us for five meetings this spring to discuss these five essays in visual media theory

Our group aims to read and discuss five key essays in visual media theory. We will take up a different reading for each of the five meeting times listed below. Our discussions will revolve around not only the importance of the readings for media studies fields, but also how we might apply the various concepts and approaches in the essays to our teaching within our various disciplines.

Facilitators:
Donald Jellerson, Film Studies Coordinator and Associate Professor in Languages and Literatures, will facilitate Reading group participants who have expertise in one or more of the essays on the reading list may choose to lead a discussion. (Please let Dr. Jellerson know if you have experience with a particular essay and would like to volunteer to lead a session).

Space is limited
Book and refreshments provided.


Meeting times/dates:
Tuesdays 12:30-1:30 p.m.

January 29, February 19, March 12, April 9, & April 30

Location:

UC 261


 
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The Practice of Adaptive Leadership Discussion Group
"The Practice of Adaptive Leadership: Tools and Tactics for Changing your Organization and the World"

By Ronald A. Heifetz, Marty Linsky, and Alexander Grashow

When change requires us to challenge others' familiar reality, it can be difficult, dangerous work. Whatever the context - whether in the private or the public sector - many will feel threatened as we push through major changes. As leaders, we need to find ways to make it work. This book group will focus our discussion on addressing the challenges of change and the resources that leaders of all kinds can use to assist us in our work.

Facilitators:

Susan Elrod- Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
Catherine Chan- Associate Professor, Biological Sciences and Chemistry
Patricia Clasen- Interim Dean, College of Integrated Studies & Professor, Communication
Kristin Plessel- Associate Professor, Chemistry
Susan Windermuth- Professor, Communication

Space is limited
Book and refreshments provided.

Meeting times/dates:
Tuesdays 12:30-1:30 p.m.

March 5, March 12, March 19, April 2, April 16

Location:

UC 069


 
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College Students' Sense of Belonging, 2nd Edition Discussion Group
"College Students' Sense of Belonging, A Key to Educational Success for All Students"

By: Terrell Strayhorn

As a follow up to Dr. Strayhorn’s Fall Forum presentation on campus last fall, this group will discuss the updated edition of Dr. Strayhorn’s seminal book on belongingness. The publisher’s abstract below explains the outline of the book, which will guide the group’s discussion

“Belonging―with peers, in the classroom, or on campus―is a critical dimension of success at college. It can affect a student’s degree of academic adjustment, achievement, aspirations, or even whether a student stays in school. This book explores how belonging differs based on students’ social identities, such as race, gender, sexual orientation, or the conditions they encounter on campus. The 2nd Edition of College Students’ Sense of Belonging explores student sub-populations and campus environments, offering readers updated information about sense of belonging, how it develops for students, and a conceptual model for helping students belong and thrive. Underpinned by theory and research and offering practical guidelines for improving educational environments and policies, this book is an important resource for higher education and student affairs professionals, scholars, and graduate students interested in students’ success.”

Facilitators:
JDr. Kenny Yarbrough, Chief Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Officer & Brent Bilodeau, Interim Vice-Chancellor for Student Affairs
Space is limited
Book and refreshments provided.

Meeting times/dates:
Wednesdays at 12:00

April 3 in UC269, April 10 in UC 269, April 17 in UC261, April 24 in UC 269, & May 1 in UC261


 
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Fall 2018 Book Groups

Janesville: An American Story

By: Amy Goldstein

Pulitzer-prize winning journalist, Amy Goldstein describes the effects of the closure of the GM assembly plant to the lives of ordinary Americans: autoworkers, teachers, job retrainers, bankers, and others. Reviews almost universally praise "Janesville: An American Story" for its compassion and sensitivity, born from a refusal to use their lives for any singular political ideological lens. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: "While it highlights many moments of resilience and acts of compassion, Amy Goldstein's 'Janesville: An American Story' also has a tragic feel. It depicts the noble striving of men and women against overpowering forces - in this case, economic ones."

We have much to learn from this book about ourselves, our region, and our partners.

Facilitators:
Elena Levy-Navarro, Professor and Chair of Languages & Literatures
Jolly Emrey, Associate Professor and Chair of Political Science

Meeting times/dates:
Thursdays, 12:30-1:30pm
September 20, October 4, October 18, November 1, November 15, and December 6

Location:
University Center 266


 
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The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare Students for a World in Flux

By: Cathy N. Davidson

When transformative technologies appear and begin to reshape society, we rely on higher education to prepare our students for economic survival. In late 19th and early 20th century America, broad societal changes produced our current system of grades, departments, and graduate and professional schools to ready young people for a world upended by the telegraph and Model T. Davidson argues that today we are experiencing a moment of even greater upheaval-yet we have not witnessed a corresponding revolution in higher education.

Facilitators:
Elizabeth Hachten, CoLS
Marilyn Durham, Languages and Literatures

Meeting times/dates:
Tuesdays 11:00am-12:00pm
September 11, September 18, September 25, October 2, October 9, October 16, and October 23

Location:
University Center 261


 
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Dynamic Lecturing: Research-Based Strategies to Enhance Lecture Effectiveness

By: Christine Harrington, Todd Zakrajsek and José Antonio Bowen

"Is the lecture an outmoded teaching method that inhibits active learning or is it a potentially powerful tool that is an essential part of every teacher's repertoire?" This is the primary question that we will discuss as we read the authors' presentation of current research and practical advice on best practices for planning, delivering and evaluating lectures. Join this group to explore how lecture and active learning can complement each other rather than compete as pedagogical approaches.

Facilitators:
Barbara Beaver, Psychology
Heather Pelzel, Biology

Meeting times/dates:
Thursdays 12:30-1:30pm
September 13, September 27, October 11, October 25, November 8, & November 29

Location:
University Center 261


 
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Breakaway Learners: Strategies for Post-Secondary Success with At-Risk Students

By: Karen Gross

In this provocative book, Gross explores ways in which colleges and universities can work to address inequities by altering their relationship with "breakaway" students - first-generation, low-income students who are trying to break away from the past in order to create a more secure future. Gross draws on her experiences as a first-generation student, law professor, college president, and senior policy advisor to the US Dept. of Education under President Obama to outline practical steps that post-secondary institutions can take to create structures of support and opportunity that build reciprocal trust. While acknowledging that some of her proposed changes will be controversial and likely met with resistance, she asserts that "what we're doing now isn't working for many students."

Gross explains how she thinks institutions can make this happen by helping students develop what she calls "lasticity." Lively discussions will be led by Dr. Tracey Scherr, a school psychologist, and Dr. Carolyn Morgan, a social psychologist, from the Psychology Department.

Facilitators:
Carolyn Morgan, Psychology
Tracey Scherr, Psychology

Meeting times/dates:
Wednesdays 12:00-1:00pm
September 19, October 3, October 17, October 31, November 14, & December 5

Location:
University Center 261


 
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