Classes and Curriculum

Sustainability-Focused Courses

There are a number of courses at UW-Whitewater where sustainability is a primary focus of the class or used as a lens to understand a particular subject area.  Even if you are not an Environmental Science major, some of these classes provide an opportunity to learn more about sustainability while getting General Education credits.  If you see a course that should be added to this list, please contact us and provide a syllabus so we can share best practices for using sustainability topics to teach a variety of disciplines.  A sample of these classes include:

  • ACCOUNTING 787:  Sustainability and Environmental Reporting
  • BIOLOGY 214:  Ecology and Society
  • BIOLOGY 257:  Introduction to Ecology
  • BIOLOGY 442:  Environmental Toxicology
  • BIOLOGY 457:  General Ecology
  • ECONOMICS 471:  Natural Resources and Environmental Economics
  • ENGLISH 262:  American Environmental Literature
  • ENGLISH 472:  Nature Writing
  • ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 200:  Introduction to Environmental Science
  • ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 400:  Environmental Science Capstone
  • GEOGRAPHY 252:  Human Environmental Problems
  • GEOGRAPHY 420:  Human and Climate Interactions
  • GEOGRAPHY 452:  Cultural Ecology and Sustainable Development
  • GEOLOGY 301:  Environmental Geology
  • HISTORY 190:  North American Environmental History
  • MANAGEMENT 364:  Sustainability Management
  • MANAGEMENT 366:  Social Responsibility
  • PHILOSOPHY 248:  Environmental Ethics
  • SAFETY 420:  Principles of Environmental Management
  • SAFETY 453:  Fundamental of Environmental Law
  • SOCIOLOGY 319:  Introduction to Environmental Sociology
  • WOMEN'S STUDIES 481:  Gender, Ethnicity, and the Environment

Courses That Include Sustainability

A course that includes sustainability is primarily focused on a topic other than sustainability, but incorporates a unit or module on sustainability or a sustainability challenge, includes one or more sustainability-focused activity, or integrates sustainability issues throughout the course.  If you see a course that should be added to this list, please contact us and provide a syllabus so we can share best practices for using sustainability topics to teach a variety of disciplines.  A sample of these classes include:

  • BIOLOGY 120:  Biological Foundations
  • BIOLOGY 311:  Microbiology (two lectures cover biofuels and bioremediation)
  • BIOLOGY 451:  Natural History of Yellowstone NP and the Upper Great Plains
  • BIOLOGY 651:  Natural History of Yellowstone NP and the Upper Great Plains
  • ECONOMICS 431:  Economics of Globalization
  • ENGLISH 226:  American Literature Survey I
  • FINANCE/BUSINESS LAW 440:  Water Law
  • GENERAL EDUCATION 130:  Individual and Society
  • GENERAL EDUCATION 140:  Global Perspectives
  • GEOGRAPHY 120:  Introduction to Weather and Climate
  • GEOGRAPHY 210:  Physical Geography
  • GEOGRAPHY 230:  Human Geography
  • GEOGRAPHY 300:  Soil Science
  • GEOGRAPHY 320:  Meteorology and Climate
  • GEOGRAPHY 323:  Water Resources
  • GEOGRAPHY 352:  GeoHazards
  • GEOGRAPHY 365:  Geography of Latin America
  • GEOGRAPHY 370:  Geographic Information Systems
  • GEOGRAPHY 377:  Remote Sensing of the Environment
  • GEOGRAPHY 477:  Advanced GIS
  • GEOGRAPHY 520:  Meteorology and Climate
  • GEOGRAPHY 523:  Water Resources
  • MANAGEMENT 366:  Social Responsibility
  • MANAGEMENT 759:  Social Responsibility
  • PHILOSOPHY 247:  Bioethics
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE 280:  Politics of Urban Equality
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE 412:  Contemporary Political Thought
  • RECREATION 351:  Outdoor Recreation Leadership
  • RECREATION 591:  Outdoor Recreation Leadership
  • SAFETY 489:  Hazardous Materials Management
  • SOCIOLOGY 321:  Sociology of Natural Disasters
  • SOCIOLOGY 340:  Collective Behavior and Social Movements
  • SOCIOLOGY 385:  Sociology of Globalization

Sustainability Immersive Experience

Students also have an opportunity to learn about sustainability concepts within a global context with valuable first-hand experiences through various travel study opportunities.  Some of those offered in the past include:

Savanna Project Faculty Training Program

The Savanna Project is a training and discussion forum for expanding the role of sustainability in teaching and learning on the UW-Whitewater campus. The training consists of three gatherings: two on-campus discussions and one off-campus field trip, and was offered twice a year.  Field trips included an ethanol plant located outside Jefferson, WI, Crave Brothers Cheese manure digester, Faville Grove Sanctuary, or various locations on a guided tour of the Kettle Moraine State Forest - Southern Unit (Resource Guide is available here: 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5).

The goal is for each participating faculty member to modify a syllabus of an existing course to incorporate a sustainability concept relevant to their discipline and class topic. Modifications could include (but certainly not limited to): incorporating new readings, adding case material, identifying guest lectures, or collaborating with other colleagues.  An overview presentation of our program is available here.

This program is currently suspended and re-launch is being investigated.  If you are a faculty member interested in participating in future offerings of this program, please contact Josh Mabie.

Past Savanna Project Agendas/Flyers:  Fall 2009 - Spring 2010 - Fall 2010 - Spring 2011 - Fall 2011

Speed Networking Among Participants

Touring the ethanol plant in Jefferson

Touring Faville Prairie near Waterloo