College of Letters & Sciences
PRS Mural

Philosophy & Religious Studies

Contact Information

 

David Simmons

Department Chair

Phone: 262-472-1232

Email: simmonsd@uww.edu

Chris Minor

Master Advisor and Liberal Studies Coorindator

Phone: 262-472-1262

Email: minorc@uww.edu

  

Mary Alkons

Academic Department Associate

Phone: 262-472-4775

Email: prsdept@uww.edu

 

Philosophy Courses

  • INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
    Philosophy 101, Credits: 3

    An introduction to philosophical thought. Representative philosophers and representative issues, such as the nature of ethical reasoning, rival theories of knowledge, and the individual's relation to society, are considered. The emphasis is on argument and analysis, and on issues which are relevant to philosophical problems.

  • TRUTH AND THE MEDIA
    Philosophy 121, Credits: 3

    There is a vast array of media outlets, political talking heads, and mass-marketed paraphernalia that claim to know what you should know, how you should feel about it, and what the best things are for you. We live thoroughly media-ted. This course critiques our current media culture on the veracity/rationality of their epistemic claims.

  • CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES
    Philosophy 245, Credits: 3

    An analysis and critical examination of contemporary moral issues related to business, science, and social policy as developed by current participants in the debate and moral philosophers of various periods and philosophical perspectives.

  • BUSINESS ETHICS
    Philosophy 246, Credits: 3

    This course offers a critical examination and discussion of ethical issues and problems which arise within all areas of business. Topics include but are not limited to: workers' rights, harassment and discrimination in the workplace, whistleblowing, and consumer ethics.

  • BIOETHICS
    Philosophy 247, Credits: 3

    This course introduces key ethical approaches such as Kantian ethics, utilitarianism, and feminist ethics and addresses their application to issues in health care. Ethical issues to be addressed may include: end of life decisions, family planning, genetic technology, access to health care, and the role of health care professionals.

  • ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
    Philosophy 248, Credits: 3

    A critical examination of ethical issues and problems arising from human interaction with non-human animals and the natural environment. Topics, such as the moral status of non-human animals, the moral bases of an environmental ethics, biodiversity, and sustainable development, will be considered by examining the writing of philosophers representing various perspectives.

  • LOGIC
    Philosophy 251, Credits: 3

    In this course, students will develop skill in recognizing, constructing, and evaluating arguments, both deductive and inductive. Methods include identifying formal and informal fallacies, techniques for determining the validity of deductive arguments, and symbolizing English arguments.

  • INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
    Philosophy 261, Credits: 3

    The first half of this course studies major ethical theories, offering students some frameworks for moral reasoning. The second half of the course applies those theories to a variety of current moral issues of immediate relevance to the students' lives.

  • INTRODUCTION TO AESTHETICS
    Philosophy 271, Credits: 3

    An analysis and discussion of problems as to the nature of art, artistic truth or insight, aesthetic appreciation, evaluation of works of art, creativity, and the role of the artist in society.

  • SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY
    Philosophy 281, Credits: 3

    A discussion of ideas that are basic to thinking about society, its purposes, and its structure. Such ideas as justice, equality, rights, obligations and freedom are examined.

  • KNOWLEDGE AND REALITY
    Philosophy 310, Credits: 3

    This course examines key philosophical positions and figures regarding knowledge (epistemology) and reality (metaphysics). We will ask questions such as: What do we know? How do we know? What is reality? Why is there a world? What is space? What is time? and What is social ontology?

  • PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
    Philosophy 320, Credits: 3

    Science is an important human enterprise. This course is designed to provide a more philosophical understanding of science so that one can critically assess claims people make about evidence, confirmation, theory, model, simulation, causation, etc. It presupposes no previous knowledge of philosophy or any particular science, only a serious curiosity about them.

  • CLASSICAL PHILOSOPHY
    Philosophy 341, Credits: 3

    An introduction to the major figures in Greek philosophy, including representative pre-Socratic philosophers, Plato, and Aristotle, focusing on Classical sources of philosophy of science, ethics, political philosophy, and theory of knowledge.

  • MODERN PHILOSOPHY
    Philosophy 342, Credits: 3

    This course concentrates on the main movements in philosophy from Descartes through Kant. Principal works from the major philosophers will be read.

  • 19TH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY
    Philosophy 346, Credits: 3

    This course concentrates on the main movements in 19th century philosophy. Selections from principal works of major philosophers of the period, such as Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Marx, Husserl, Peirce, and James, will be critically examined.

  • 20TH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY
    Philosophy 347, Credits: 3

    This course concentrates on the main movements in 20th century philosophy. Selections from principal works of major philosophers of the period, such as Ayer, Wittgenstein, Quine, Carnap, Heidegger, Sartre, Irigary, Lyotard, and Derrida will be critically examined.

  • PHILOSOPHY OF MIND
    Philosophy 350, Credits: 3

    This course explores conceptual issues including: how mental activities correlate with brain activities, how the mind relates to action, how the mind's attention can be gripped by the physical world, and how research in A.I. informs our understanding of the nature of the mind.

  • SEXUAL ETHICS
    Philosophy 351, Credits: 3

    This course covers a range of moral issues surrounding sex and sexuality through the lens of contemporary analytic philosophy. Topics include but are not limited to: gender identity, gender equality, discrimination, sexual exploitation, consent, prostitution, and pornography. PHILSPHY 261: Introduction to Ethics is recommended but not required.

  • ETHICS OF GAMING
    Philosophy 355, Credits: 3

    The course uses central ethical theories to investigate gaming. We will focus on questions such as "What is a game?" "What is cheating?" "How is my identity and agency within a game related to my identity and agency outside of a gaming environment?" "What distinguishes esports from non-esports?" "How can we ethically treat professionals in the gaming industry?

  • THEORIES OF THE SELF
    Philosophy 360, Credits: 3

    Humans begin to recognize persisting objects at 18 - 24 months old but don¿t develop a substantial conception of self until 3 - 4 years old, and that conception then evolves throughout the rest of our lives. Drawing insights from multiple disciplines-- philosophy, psychology, literature, Zen, etc.-- this course provides students with tools to conceptualize who they are in the midst of their desires, emotions, reasoning, social interactions, and work. Students will also confront the question of whether, and to what extent, it is meaningful to conceive of their life as a narrative.

  • EXISTENTIALISM
    Philosophy 364, Credits: 3

    Existentialism is the philosophy of the individual - existing, concrete individual, As a reaction against totalitizing systems that leave individuals as small cogs in the wheel of history. Existentialists tackle questions about what it means to be an individual and the struggle of living in freedom - and so shall we.

  • PHILOSOPHY OF GENDER AND RACE
    Philosophy 381, Credits: 3

    This course examines the philosophical assumptions underlying concepts of gender and race. Topics include: historical and contemporary arguments about race and gender as biological categories; the relationship between the use of these categories and the persistence of sexism and racism; and race and gender in theories of subjectivity.

  • FEMINIST PHILOSOPHY
    Philosophy 390, Credits: 3

    An introduction to feminist philosophy including its relation to other philosophical traditions, its historical development, and its relevance to concerns in areas such as ethics, theory of knowledge, political philosophy, and philosophy of religion.

  • WORKSHOP
    Philosophy 490, Credits: 1-3

    Variable topics. Group activity oriented presentations emphasizing `hands on` and participatory instructional techniques. Repeatable

  • INTERNSHIP IN PHILOSPHY
    Philosophy 493, Credits: 1-12

    Study and work with a government unit or in some area of public affairs under the direction of a faculty supervisor. Students will have the opportunity to combine academic learning with practical experience in government and politics. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits in major/degree.

  • SEMINAR
    Philosophy 494, Credits: 1-3

    Variable topics.Group activity. An advanced course of study in a defined subject matter area emphasizing a small group in intense study with a faculty member. Repeatable

  • SPECIAL STUDIES
    Philosophy 496, Credits: 1-3

    Variable topics. Group activity. Not offered regularly in the curriculum but offered on topics selected on the basis of timeliness, need, and interest, and generally in the format of regularly scheduled Catalog offerings. Repeatable

  • EXCHANGE STUDY
    Philosophy 497, Credits: 1-12

    Variable topics.

  • INDEPENDENT STUDY
    Philosophy 498, Credits: 1-3

    Study of a selected topic or topics under the direction of a faculty member. Repeatable