LEARN Center Workshops 2017-2018

2017-18 Learn Center Workshops

 

Growth Mindset in the Classroom at UW-Whitewater 

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
UC 259B | 12 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. | Lunch is Included!
Register by October 13, 2017

At an August seminar and workshop led by Dr. David Yeager, the UW- Whitewater community began a discussion of how to create an environment in the classroom and out that fosters a growth mindset. At this meeting, we will hear from a panel of your UWW peers on how they have begun to incorporate growth mindset ideas and interventions into their courses. Some of the session will be devoted to a discussion on how and when you could use these in your own courses with the opportunity to gather into the campus initiatives groups that were formed during the original workshop (Academic Innovation, LEAP, ePortfolio, STEM Transformation, Reimagining the First Year, and Improving Academic Advising). Those that did not attend the August session are encouraged to attend and learn more about this approach to student development!

Participants will network with others who are using or planning to use growth mindset interventions to facilitate collaborations.

Presentations by:
Jessica Bonjour, Chemistry
Jane Gottlick, Political Science
Jeff Heinrich, Economics

Register by October 13, 2017

 

Student Engagement: How Can We Facilitate Self-Regulation and Persistence?: Lessons Learned 

Thursday, October 26, 2017
UC 275A | 12 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. | Lunch is Included!
Reserve your spot by October 19, 2017

Mazer (2013)[i] notes that student engagement and interest can lead to higher levels of student satisfaction, success, and retention. As important as engagement may be to student success in college, today’s students have a multitude of issues competing for their attention (e.g., families, jobs, financial concerns, social media etc.). As these concerns do not disappear when a student enters (or logs into) a class, cultivating student engagement can be a significant challenge to instructors trying to help students learn course material. The Learning Technology Center and LEARN Center are pleased to co-sponsor a 3-part workshop series focused on student engagement, based on issues identified by faculty in recent instructor support surveys. This series will focus on current opportunities and challenges relating to student engagement, in both face-to-face and online courses.
By taking part in the Student Engagement Workshops Series, instructors will be able to:

  • Examine different research-supported approaches to student engagement
  • Compare and contrast different methods of engaging students across different modalities
  • Practice using different technologies and techniques to engage students

Student Engagement: How Can We Facilitate Self-Regulation and Persistence?: Lessons Learned
Fellow instructors will share their personal experiences and approaches toward engaging students!

[i] Mazer, J. P. (2013). Validity of the student interest and engagement scales: Associations with student learning outcomes. Communication Studies, 64, 125-140. But most people have grown up in an educational system that valued knowers, people who have memorized facts or skills.

Register by October 19, 2017

 

Open Forum: Student Sense of Belonging and Faculty/Staff Mentoring

Monday, November 6, 2017
UC 259 | 3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

The campus community is invited to an open forum. Leaders from the Reimagining the First Year (RFY) initiative will share findings from campus-wide focus group conversations and surveys conducted last spring. Learn about what others have said and share your thoughts and experiences with mentoring here at UW-Whitewater.

The RFY team is seeking your feedback to help us plan our next steps in fostering a supportive student-centered campus. We look forward to hearing student perspectives and conversations between faculty, staff, and students.

If you have any questions about this forum, please contact Sally Lange at learn@uww.edu or (262) 472-5242.

 

Student Engagement: Technologies and Techniques

Monday, November 6, 2017
UC 261 | 12 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. | Lunch is Included!
Reserve your spot by October 30, 2017

Mazer (2013)[i] notes that student engagement and interest can lead to higher levels of student satisfaction, success, and retention. As important as engagement may be to student success in college, today’s students have a multitude of issues competing for their attention (e.g., families, jobs, financial concerns, social media etc.). As these concerns do not disappear when a student enters (or logs into) a class, cultivating student engagement can be a significant challenge to instructors trying to help students learn course material. The Learning Technology Center and LEARN Center are pleased to co-sponsor a 3-part workshop series focused on student engagement, based on issues identified by faculty in recent instructor support surveys. This series will focus on current opportunities and challenges relating to student engagement, in both face-to-face and online courses.
By taking part in the Student Engagement Workshops Series, instructors will be able to:

  • Examine different research-supported approaches to student engagement
  • Compare and contrast different methods of engaging students across different modalities
  • Practice using different technologies and techniques to engage students

Student Engagement: Technologies and Techniques
Learn about different technologies and techniques used to engage students, and then apply what you learn!

[i] Mazer, J. P. (2013). Validity of the student interest and engagement scales: Associations with student learning outcomes. Communication Studies, 64, 125-140. But most people have grown up in an educational system that valued knowers, people who have memorized facts or skills.

Register by October 30, 2017

 

The Meaning of Learning:
Metacognition and Student Motivation

Friday, November 17, 2017
Dr. Saundra McGuire

Get Students to Focus on Learning Instead of Grades:
Metacognition is the Key!

9:00-10:30 a.m. • Timmerman Auditorium (Hyland 1000)

21st Century students come to college with widely varying academic skills, approaches to learning, and motivation levels. Faculty often lament that students are focused on achieving high grades, but are not willing to invest much time or effort in learning. This session will focus on the importance of helping students acquire simple, but effective learning strategies based on cognitive science principles. We will engage in interactive reflection activities that will allow attendees to experience strategies that significantly improve learning while transforming student attitudes about the meaning of learning.

Strategies for Effectively Mentoring 21st Century Students

10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. • Timmerman Auditorium (Hyland 1000)

Effective mentoring has long been recognized as important for success in professional and academic environments. However, mentors are seldom provided the training to ensure that the mentoring relationship will be most beneficial to the protégé and to the mentor. This interactive workshop will discuss strategies for effective mentoring of today's students, and will contrast the behaviors of masterful vs misguided mentors. Additionally, techniques for producing proactive vs. problematic protégés will be discussed.

Increasing Student Motivation: Strategies that work

12:30-3:00 p.m. • Upham 145 • Lunch is provided.

Motivating today's students to actively engage in learning activities proves challenging for most faculty. Very often millennial students do not respond as did students in the past to extrinsic motivators such as bonus quizzes and extra credit assignments. However, as James Raffini presents in 150 Ways to Increase Intrinsic Motivation in the Classroom, when the psychoacademic needs of students are met in creative ways, student motivation soars. This presentation will engage faculty in a discussion of addressing student needs for autonomy, competence, relatedness, self-esteem, and enjoyment in order to significantly increase student motivation.

Dr. Saundra Yancy McGuire is the Director Emerita of the Center for Academic Success and retired Assistant Vice Chancellor and Professor of Chemistry at LSU. Prior to joining LSU, she spent eleven years at Cornell University. Her latest book, Teach Students How to Learn: Strategies You Can Incorporate into Any Course to Improve Student Metacognition, Study Skills, and Motivation, was released in October 2015.

She received the 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Lifetime Mentor Award and the 2014 Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE) and is an elected Fellow of the ACS, AAAS, and Council of Learning Assistance and Developmental Education Associations (CLADEA). In November 2007 the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring was presented to her in a White House Oval Office Ceremony.

This event is sponsored by the Science Academy Growth Agenda Grant, the LEAP project and the LEARN Center.

 

Managing End of Semester Student Crisis Tips and tools for helping students navigate a stressful time of year

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Wednesday, November 29
UC 259B |Noon-1p.m. | Lunch is Included!
Reserve your spot by November 22, 2017

At the end of a semester many students experience abnormally elevated levels of stress. This presentation is designed to help you recognize when a student's level of stress might warrant an intervention and how to intervene appropriately and safely.

By taking part in this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Learn to be able to recognize some of the signs and symptoms of students who might be in crisis.
  • Learn how to support students, while maintaining healthy boundaries.
  • Have a better understanding of when to reach out for consultation/feedback about a student.

Presentations by:
Andrew Browning
CARE Team Case Manager
Dean of Student Office

Register by November 22, 2017

 

Grit and Growth Mindset: Why Some Environments Motivate People to Become Excellent

Are you interested in learning more about the mindset and belongingness interventions that David Yeager discussed? Visit the Mindset Scholars Network for information and resources.

Tuesday August 29, 2017
UC 275 A&B | 11 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. | Lunch is Included!
Reserve your spot by August 22, 2017

Today, it’s more important than ever to be a learner: that is, to be able to teach yourself new skills, using your connections to experts or resources you find, for example, online. But most people have grown up in an educational system that valued knowers, people who have memorized facts or skills.

  • How can you create an environment that fosters the grit needed to be a self-directed learner?
  • How can you shake people out of the outdated model of education so they can adapt their skills and knowledge to the modern and quickly changing economy?

This workshop will focus on linking Dr. Yeager's timely message to many of the student success initiatives active at UW-Whitewater. Participants are encouraged to select one of the campus initiatives below as their affinity group for the workshop.

As a part of the registration process, please email the LEARN Center with your choice of the campus initiative you prefer to work with during this workshop:

Academic Innovation
Discuss and share innovative assignments that build student persistence and grit. Let's pool our ideas and discuss already proven pedagogies and specific assignments that engage students as valued learners and that build an environment where we all try "hard things" and "support a learning mindset" - whether in your courses or programs.

LEAP
The Liberal Education & America's Promise (LEAP) initiative from the Association of American Colleges and Universities has become interwoven into the institutional culture at UW-W to promote and advance student success. Participants in this group will use components of the LEAP initiative to examine avenues for the enactment of a growth mindset centered on the importance of learning outcomes, the pursuit of excellence, equity, and the value of high-impact education at practices.

ePortfolio
A student's time at UW-W is much more than one-off courses and grades--it's about the integrative experience. The UW-W Integrative Learning ePortfolio Initiative aims to prepare students to make connections among their academic (New Student Seminar, General Education, Programs/Majors), co-curricular, extracurricular, and other life experiences during their time at UW-W in order to articulate their story as an educated citizen and market-ready professional, whatever their career path.

STEM
STEM (Sciene, Technology, Engineering, & Math) transformation seeks to support student persistence to degrees in biology, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, mathematics, and physics. Join us to explore how you might contribute your teaching skills to that pursuit.

RFY - Mentoring
Join members of the Reimagining-the-First-Year project to explore many ways faculty and staff can support students and learning at the UW-W. Our overall goal is to foster a mentoring culture at UW-W.‚Äč

RFY - Curriculum Redesign
The overall goal of the Curriculum and Pedagogy Task Force of the RFY project is to enable more students - including low income, underrepresented minority and first generation students - to experience academic success in their first-year and gateway courses. Our work to date has focused on data gathering and analysis, professional development for instructors in first-year and gateway courses, and targeted curricular changes.

Improve Academic Advising
Academic advising has improved in many ways across campus, yet student feedback indicates areas where further improvements can be made. Advising leaders across campus are working on additional ways to "improve the student engagement, experience, and satisfaction with academic advising to provide a more comprehensive approach consistent with our campus LEAP initiative."

Other

Register by August 22, 2017

Student Engagement: Challenges in the 21st Century 

Wednesday September 27, 2017
UC 259B | 12 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. | Lunch is Included!
Reserve your spot by September 20, 2017

Mazer (2013)[i] notes that student engagement and interest can lead to higher levels of student satisfaction, success, and retention. As important as engagement may be to student success in college, today’s students have a multitude of issues competing for their attention (e.g., families, jobs, financial concerns, social media etc.). As these concerns do not disappear when a student enters (or logs into) a class, cultivating student engagement can be a significant challenge to instructors trying to help students learn course material. The Learning Technology Center and LEARN Center are pleased to co-sponsor a 3-part workshop series focused on student engagement, based on issues identified by faculty in recent instructor support surveys. This series will focus on current opportunities and challenges relating to student engagement, in both face-to-face and online courses.
By taking part in the Student Engagement Workshops Series, instructors will be able to:

  • Examine different research-supported approaches to student engagement
  • Compare and contrast different methods of engaging students across different modalities
  • Practice using different technologies and techniques to engage students

Student Engagement: Challenges in the 21st Century

What are we actually talking about when we say “student engagement?” How do we even know when students are engaged? This interactive session introduces key concepts relating to student engagement, and lays a framework for discussing engagement in the future sessions. We will discuss challenges to facilitating student engagement; including learning myths, interpretations of nonverbal behaviors, and commonly believed “illusions” of learning and teaching.

[i] Mazer, J. P. (2013). Validity of the student interest and engagement scales: Associations with student learning outcomes. Communication Studies, 64, 125-140. But most people have grown up in an educational system that valued knowers, people who have memorized facts or skills.

Register by September 20, 2017