Academics

Are you into biology or theatre arts? Math or English literature? Are you associate degree-focused or bachelor's degree bound?

However you like it, UW-Whitewater at Rock County has classes and degree paths to help you discover your passions and meet your career goals. Here, you'll find professors dedicated to teaching, and course options that fit your life. The 2019-2020 course schedule will be available this November. To see previous course offerings, go to our current course schedule for Fall 2018 »

Academic Offerings

You'll find the following academic departments represented at UW-Whitewater at Rock County.  

  • Anthropology & Sociology
  • Art
  • Biological Science
  • Business & Economics
  • Chemistry
  • Communication & Theatre Arts
  • Computer Science, Engineering, Physics & Astronomy
  • English
  • Geography & Geology
  • Health, Exercise Science & Athletics
  • History
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Psychology & Education
  • Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies Program
  • World Languages

Associate of Arts and Sciences (AAS) degree

The Associate of Arts and Sciences (AAS) degree is the foundation for many college majors and for the bachelor's degree. The AAS degree provides a two-year, general education liberal arts-based academic program with training in the fine arts and humanities, mathematical and natural sciences, and social sciences.

The AAS degree is a foundation for many majors in the University of Wisconsin System and is generally accepted by other University of Wisconsin System institutions as fulfilling the university-wide general education breadth requirements. Students may earn the Associate of Arts and Sciences Degree with Emphasis.

About the Degree
The degree requires that core requirements in writing and mathematics be completed as well as a distribution of credits in breadth of knowledge categories.The breadth categories in the degree are defined as follows:

Fine Arts and Humanities
Students must acquire knowledge of ideas, beliefs, and abiding concerns pertaining to the human condition as represented in literature, philosophy and cultural history. They must acquire a level of aesthetic appreciation of the human imagination as expressed in the fine arts, and appreciation of the impact of the arts upon the quality and character of human life.

Mathematical and Natural Sciences
Students must know of the nature and workings of the physical universe. They must understand the scientific method, the functions of numerical data and the solving of problems through mathematical and statistical computations, as well as the application of the scientific method in laboratory and experimental work. For this, an appropriate level of computer literacy is required. Students must also be aware of environmental conditions and challenges, the interrelationships of life forms and ecosystems, and the impact of human activities upon natural environments.

Social Sciences
Students must understand the nature and dynamics of human social systems and how and why people organize their lives and resources. In doing so, students will learn about both their own and diverse cultures to acquire a historical perspective on long-term characteristics and consequences of social change and an informed understanding of the variety of human conditions and the interrelationships of nations, regions, peoples and individuals.

Application and Performance
Students must demonstrate an understanding of concepts, theory and knowledge through the application of their skills and understanding to specific problems and activities.

Ethnic Studies
Students must become aware of and sensitive to diversity issues and problems. Courses fulfilling this requirement will have a substantial emphasis on cultural diversity within the United States and examine these issues from at least one of the following perspectives: African American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian American, and American Indian topics.

Interdisciplinary Studies
Students must acquire an appreciation for the multiple dimensions of any given subject by applying the content, methods and assumptions of two or more disciplines. Students will learn to integrate knowledge from across the curriculum. A course is an interdisciplinary studies course if instructors from two or more disciplines teach the course.

At UW-Whitewater at Rock County, we offer a number of special academic programs to support and supplement our curriculum and co-curricular offerings.

The First Year Experience Program helps students transition to college by offering classroom opportunities that maximize academic success, building positive relationships among faculty, staff and students; and providing campus-wide resources tailored to first-year students.   

The centerpiece of our First-Year Experience Program is LEC 100, our one-credit, first-year courses that focus on the skills students need for academic and career success. LEC 100 not only helps students in their transition to college, but it also counts towards their associate degree.


Students who maintain a GPA at or above 3.5, earn a grade of B or better in 12-credits of honors sections, and earn the AAS degree, may apply to graduate with honors.


Service learning means using what you learn in the classroom to find solutions to real-life problems in your community. Though service learning, you not only learn the practical applications of your studies, you become an engaged citizen and community member. In that way, service learning helps both you and the community.

In and out of the classroom, UW-Whitewater at Rock County faculty and staff strive to prepare students to become lifelong learners, responsible citizens, and community leaders. For example, our LEC 100 course includes a service learning component, where students participate in out-of-class activities to learn the real-world value of the classes they are taking. 


TRIO's mission is to provide equal educational opportunities for low-income, first-generation and people with disabilities who are highly motivated, eligible students seeking their college degree.


The Early College Credit Program presents exciting educational options for eligible Wisconsin high school juniors and seniors. By meeting some general requirements and following specific guidelines, you may be able to take university-level courses at UW-Whitewater at Rock County, earning both high school and college credit. What's more, you do not have to pay for a course if your school board determines the course is not comparable to a course offered in the school district. All public high schools participate in the Early College Credit Program. And so, all juniors and seniors who meet the program requirements are eligible.


Campus Location

2909 Kellogg Avenue
Janesville, WI 53546
608-758-6565
rckinfo@uwc.edu

Admissions Office

Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Roseman Building 2060 
800 West Main Street
Whitewater, WI 53190-1791
262-472-1440
uwwadmit@uww.edu
Request Information »

Follow us

Facebook Twitter