University Marketing and Communications

University Marketing and Communications

UW-Whitewater storytelling support and marketing solutions

University Marketing and Communications is UW-Whitewater’s resource for communications, storytelling, media relations, graphic design, social media and more. Our office leads strategic marketing efforts to increase enrollment and retention, and supports efforts of the Chancellor’s Office and University Advancement. Looking for a campus story? You’ll probably find it in the story archive. We also manage the university’s digital asset management system, a searchable archive of thousands of high-quality photos, campus logos and other artifacts — available to anyone with a UW-Whitewater NetID and password. We’re also here to answer any questions about licensing and brand usage that our Campus Identity Standards don’t answer. In addition, we produce Warhawk Weekly, an e-newsletter regularly sent out to all faculty, staff and students.

Questions? Contact news@uww.edu.


Our stories

Follow UW-Whitewater on Social Media

We are always looking for great story ideas. If you know of a student, faculty or staff member, or alum who deserves a shout-out, email us at news@uww.edu.

Online Business Card Request Forms

If you would like to order new business cards, please complete the faculty/staff business card request form.

If you have any questions about the request form, please contact Nadia Bidwell in University Marketing and Communications at bidwelln@uww.edu.

Minimum quantity of 100. Please order in even numbers.

If you have any questions about the printing or delivery of cards, please contact Printing Services at copyservices@uww.edu.

Prices for cards:
100 cards: $12
250 cards: $20
500 cards: $27

Please log out of any personal Google accounts before selecting the business card request link. You will be redirected to a UW-Whitewater login page.

Business Card Options

Front option 1:

Front option 2:

Back:

University Marketing and Communications is happy to help with your marketing and communication efforts in support of the UW-Whitewater brand. For any project, big or small, please visit www.uww.edu/umc/project-request and fill out the form.

UW-Whitewater's searchable archive, or digital asset management system (DAM), of university photography from 2012-present is available for students, staff and faculty to use for university-related purposes via the UW-Whitewater Libris library. You will need your Net ID and password to log in. We are uploading new and archived photos continually, so check back often!

Our office is charged with managing campus-wide announcements, also known as broadcast emails. This system is designed to facilitate the dissemination of critical information to the campus community. Any administrative unit or academic department associated with UW-Whitewater may post an announcement request as long as it meets university policy. Once approved, the announcement will be posted to the Announcements website and will be sent to campus groups via a mass e-mail. The system is not meant for general event promotion — events should be posted on the campus calendar at events.uww.edu.

to request an announcement or to view an archived announcement, visit https://announcements.uww.edu/.

Our visual identity is an important part of who we are. It sparks recognition and a sense of belonging. To maintain our reputation for excellence, it is essential that we all work together to ensure the UW-Whitewater identity is applied consistently everywhere. A unified brand identity makes our university stronger.

Read more »

Jeff Angileri
Director of Communications
(262) 472-1195
angilerj@uww.edu

Sara Kuhl
Assistant Vice Chancellor
(262) 472-1194
kuhls@uww.edu

Our visual identity is an important part of who we are. It sparks recognition and a sense of belonging. To maintain our reputation for excellence, it is essential that we all work together to ensure the UW-Whitewater identity is applied consistently everywhere. A unified brand identity makes our university stronger.

Read more »

Looking for an expert on workplace safety practices, Egyptian literature, school counseling or metalworking? We’ve got you covered. Our searchable database will connect you with someone with the answers: my.uww.edu/facultyexpertisedatabase.

What percentage of new students live on campus? What percentage of Warhawks stay in the region after earning their degree? How many degrees does the university award every year? This is your one-stop shop for up-to-date data on UW-Whitewater. (Answers: 97%, 90% and 2,900+): www.uww.edu/irp/fast-facts.

Our visual identity is an important part of who we are. It sparks recognition and a sense of belonging. To maintain our reputation for excellence, it is essential that we all work together to ensure the UW-Whitewater identity is applied consistently everywhere. A unified brand identity makes our university stronger.

Read more »

Our goals are clarity, consistency and brevity. In general, our office follows Associated Press style, “Garner’s Modern American Usage” and “Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary.”

Read more »

Blogs, social networks and websites are exciting channels to share information and connect with others. UW-Whitewater is active in these online communities and supports the participation of colleges, departments and other units, as well.

University Marketing and Communications manages all university-level social media accounts. These currently include Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram.

Read more »

The best practices for submitting your videos for publication:

  1. Go to your camera record settings and if possible, set them to 1080p HD or 720p HD.
  2. Unless otherwise requested, always film subjects with the camera in a horizontal position.
  3. When recording sound, place camera no further than two or three feet from subject. Record indoors in a quiet location.
  4. Light subjects from the front and avoid bright lights or windows behind subjects.
  5. Secure camera on a tripod or stand if possible. Otherwise, hold camera as steady as possible.
  6. When recording yourself, position the camera at eye level to avoid ceilings, lights and create a more pleasing angle.
  7. Wait a few seconds before and after speaking and continue to look at camera before reaching to turn camera on or off.
  8. Wear solid colors (except all-white or black tops unless with a jacket/sweater). No commercial logos, unless it’s UW-Whitewater gear.
  9. If you want to submit videos on a regular basis, you can increase the quality of your videos by purchasing accessories like a tripod or stand, an external microphone or lights.
  10. Download your videos to a shared drive like Google Drive. Videos that are 20MB or less can be emailed.

Please contact videographer Jeffrey Pohorski at pohorskj@uww.edu with any questions.

Quick tips for making a professional portrait:

  1. Most cameras perform well with auto-exposure and auto-focus settings, so use those. For iPhone or Android, set the camera to its highest resolution. With a digital camera, use the RAW or LARGE JPEG settings.
  2. Most phone cameras can zoom in and out by dragging your thumb and index finger on the screen. Drag the frame into the middle range between wide angle and telephoto. Avoid wide angle lenses which distort features and make subjects look smaller and farther away.
  3. Avoid doing a selfie. Have someone else photograph you.
  4. Indoors, position your subject near a window on a sunny day where the light coming through the window is diffused, not direct sunlight. Turn off electric lights and florescent tubes in the room so the natural light is the only light.
  5. Outdoors, if you are limited to the harsh light of mid-day, find some partial shade where the sun is reflecting from bright surfaces like buildings, stone, water and glass. Avoid deep shade. Early and late in the day, sunlight has a soft, warm quality which is especially pleasing for portraiture.
  6. Background is what we can see behind the subject. Keep the background simple. Some photographers are so intent on the subject, they forget to notice the tree branches, power lines and clutter in the background.
  7. Now you’re ready to put your subject in the setting you’ve selected. If you have a wall or solid surface for a backdrop, ask your subject to move forward from the wall a few steps. Ask her to look at the camera but twist at the waste toward the main light source so that one shoulder is closer and more three-dimensional.
  8. Make it a team effort and have fun. How the subject feels—stressed, relaxed, nervous, confident—will be seen in the picture. Compose the picture by moving closer or farther away from your subject, or stand on a stool for a view from above.
  9. Know how the picture will be used. If you want to have prints made, you likely will need the resolution of a DSLR camera. If online is the goal, the iphone or android camera may be all you need.

If you have questions about portraits or other kinds of pictures, feel free to email photographer Craig Schreiner at schreinc@uww.edu.

Additional Resources